NCCADP @
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 11:31am

The Racial Justice Act went to the Supreme Court this week. Now, the state’s highest court must decide how North Carolina should deal with troubling revelations of racial bias in capital trials.

The oral arguments Monday were about four defendants who have been resentenced to life in prison without parole after a Superior Court judge found “a wealth of evidence showing the persistent, pervasive, and distorting role of race in jury selection throughout North Carolina,” as well as in their individual cases.

However, the larger issue is this: As a result of the Racial Justice Act, a comprehensive study found that African-Americans are being systematically denied the right to serve on capital juries. A qualified black juror in North Carolina is more than twice as likely as a white juror to be removed with a peremptory strike.

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 10:31am

The assault on the English language continues unabated:

On Sunday, though, the official Twitter account of North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory tweeted with pride that the patches on the green jackets were made in the Tar Heel State – and made double-bogey in the process.

“Great to see the patches on the infamous green jackets at @The_Masters are made in Weaverville, NC!” McCrory’s account tweeted.

But the green jackets aren’t exactly infamous – infamous, according to Merriam-Webster, means, “having a reputation of the worst kind; notoriously evil.”

This was not a typo. Apparently whoever wrote this Tweet was under the impression that "infamous" meant "really famous," something a 3rd grader might get confused, if he or she had been avoiding homework.

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James @
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 9:47am

Thom Tillis
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Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 7:26pm

Art Pope, NC's Budget Director and purchaser of elections, editorializes in the latest News and Observer on how NC's tax reforms are a "benefit to working families".

We'll make a few observations and, first off, thank the News and Observer for publishing an editorial from the "horse's mouth", rather than one of the usual surrogates from Pope's Civitas or Locke Foundation stinktanks. However, we did notice this little tagline at the end of the PopeEd:

Art Pope is the state budget director and a former member of the N.C. House of Representatives.

Funny ... I didn't notice any disclaimer on Pope's piece, noting that he didn't speak for our state government, like other state employees have to do. Did Pope have to clear the op-ed with his boss like these other employees?

Well, let's see what the Popester has to say about tax reform:

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 11:47am

Unfortunately, there are no cliffs handy for them to march off:

Conservatives are using the April 15 deadline to celebrate tax changes that North Carolina lawmakers argue will keep more money in family wallets and encourage job creation.

Gov. Pat McCrory and key legislators plan to join right-leaning policy groups Tuesday for a tax-filing day news conference in Raleigh. They plan to highlight a new annual report from the American Legislative Exchange Council to promote the tax overhaul law.

And now would be a really good time for some of our larger news outlets to do an in-depth evaluation of how ALEC operates, including how corporations take a direct hand in the crafting of legislation that is subsequently and stealthily inserted into our "public" policy system. In the absence of that explanation to the people, reporting on state government is woefully incomplete.

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 9:44am

We'll start with a fine example of ineffective government:

Here's at least part of the problem:

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Monday, April 14, 2014 - 9:05pm

Two major Duke Energy shareholders are urging other investors to vote out the directors in charge of the company's environmental, safety, and health compliance.

The California Public Employees’ Retirement System and the New York City Pension Funds wrote fellow shareholders Monday. They asked that shareholders not re-elect four members of the Duke board’s regulatory policy and operations committee at the May 1 annual meeting.

:::snip:::

The letter cites the Feb. 2 ash spill into the Dan River, saying Duke had “forewarning of the public risk” from environmental groups that had intended to sue Duke over ash contamination.

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James @
Monday, April 14, 2014 - 5:09pm

Ya gotta love the cognitive dissonance on parade in Raleigh these days, especially in the Department of Commerce, where McDecker just announced more interference by government in the affairs of business. Apparently, companies like Monster and Indeed are incapable of helping workers and employers connect with one another, so the State is getting into the act as well.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 - 3:53pm

There are two alternatives to Kay Hagan in the Democratic primary.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 - 3:34pm

Greensboro's Billy Jones was also dosed, in an effort to limit the growth of questions:

"You also made a lot of other claims in your article/ blog please provide sources for those. We are concerned that you are being paid by someone who prunes trees and does not want this technology introduced as it will hurt their business. Much of what you say is not true in your blog.

Please disclose this if this is true.

You are far too articulate to have made so many errors in factual data in your blog. Plus it mimiced another blog that was written in blue DNC."

Apparently there's a conspiracy of tree-pruners out there waging a campaign against the poor chemical companies. ;) Just a little primer for Mr. Prosser on the phenomena of 21st Century blogging, and especially the hyper-local flavor of such: we in the blogging community learned a long time ago that calling attention to something before it happens can sometimes stop it from happening. If it doesn't stop it, it does often result in answers to questions a lot of citizens may have. And pointing a bulldog like Billy Jones to further information on the subject (thanks for that, by the way, my diary had fallen off the radar), is a sure-fire way to keep him interested. A few words from Billy:

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