scharrison's blog

Two white cops charged with crimes after shooting black men who were fleeing

But being charged is a long way from being convicted:

A white Pennsylvania police officer was charged with criminal homicide just eight days after fatally shooting an unarmed black teenager in the back in a case built quickly on the testimony of multiple witnesses, video and the officer's own conflicting statements.

"You do not shoot someone in the back if they are not a threat to you," Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala said. East Pittsburgh officer Michael Rosfeld was charged Wednesday in the June 19 shooting death of 17-year-old Antwon Rose Jr. after the teen fled from a traffic stop.

In this case, the officer in question was brand new, had just been sworn in less than two hours before this shooting took place. Meaning, he probably wasn't allowed to carry a sidearm until then. But he wasn't a "rookie" in the classic sense, he had been a cop for the University of Pittsburgh for six years prior to this, until he was terminated for cause (don't know the cause yet, so don't click it). So there was apparently something hinky about this guy that was known beforehand, just as there was in this Georgia case also being prosecuted:

NC GOP wants Supreme Court to scuttle Special Master maps

Because who needs fair elections anyway:

There is literally no dirty trick these tyrants won't try to remain in power.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

It's all about the narrative...

Let me fix that for you: "It's a sad day when Republicans in the General Assembly decide to take away the legal rights of NC citizens to fight back against a China-based mega corporation that sprays shit all over their families." Much better.

"Democratic" judicial mailer produced by GOP firm KAP Strategies

And the Board of Elections needs to investigate this nonsense immediately:

"He got his start in politics while attending junior college and did everything there was to do on a nationally-targeted congressional race. His tenacity and versatility as a “super volunteer” caught the attention of national Republican operatives who brought him to Washington, D.C. as an intern and then as a Capitol Hill staffer. But it was campaigning, not policy making, that Ted Prill loved so he went to work honing his skills on races across the country.

Besides the NRCC, groups like The Free Enterprise Fund, Freedom Watch, and the U.S. Coalition for Global Engagement have sought out Ted’s expertise. He brings his talents as a senior consultant, strategic thinker and hands-on operative to corporations here in the United States and to campaigns overseas."

Make no mistake, this is part of a concerted effort to suborn the judiciary, by doing two things: a) Stacking the November ballot with Democrats to dilute their chances, and b) Alienating voters from the Democratic Party in general with this ham-handed fake outreach. This story is developing, as I'm still trying to connect the moneymen behind it...

Salisbury's annual Pride Festival proves change can happen

Even in the most unlikely places:

Salisbury Pride President Beth Meadows said that this year’s Pride Festival was uneventful. Uneventful in that the crowds of attendees were large, the groups of protesters slim and the environment warm and welcoming for all, she said.

For the festival, now in its eighth year, things haven’t always been smooth sailing. Many protested the event and raised concerns after its first occurrence in 2011. Debate arose afterward about whether the event would be able to continue. “We were just going to do one year. We expected 500 people to show up. Then 2,500 people showed up,” said Meadows. “We saw how much we really needed this in the community. … It’s a passion of mine now that we have to continue to make it better every year.”

While it's fantastic to see the huge turnouts in metro areas like Raleigh and Charlotte, it takes an incredible amount of courage to do this in smaller cities and towns. And getting support from local government officials may be the key to jumping the hurdles put in place by those who don't want to stir the pot:

Offshore drilling update: Approval for seismic testing may come soon

Whether NC's coastal residents want it or not:

The steps to seismic testing in the South Atlantic include approval of the incidental harassment authorizations by the National Marine Fisheries Service, which could then be followed by approval of the permits from the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). According to NOAA’s website, the public comment period for proposed seismic permits in the Atlantic closed last July. The comment review and final determination process typically takes, according to the site, one to three months.

“We are working through about 17,000 public comments as expeditiously as possible, but will take the time necessary to ensure that they are all appropriately addressed and that our final decision is based on the best available science,” Kate Brogan, a National Marine Fisheries Service spokeswoman, wrote in an email.

I can't help but stir my tea leaves when a government official says, "best available science." Because they are the ones who decide what's best, what's available, and (of course) what is "science" as opposed to opinion. All that said, both the NOAA and the Marine Fisheries branch are part of a dwindling group of Federal regulatory entities that are still at least trying to do their jobs properly. But that may be about to change:

NC Senate Republicans spoil effort to increase school psychologists

Because they've never met a bill they didn't want to hijack:

Lawmakers focused on improving school safety for months have planned to address a significant shortage of school psychologists, but none of the related bills filed by legislators look like they are going anywhere during this legislative session.

The proposal had broad support, and passed unanimously in the House, but the bill failed after the Senate tacked on a controversial and unrelated healthcare provision. Then the Senate stalled the House's attempts to resurrect the psychology provision in another bill about licensing regulation in various industries. That bill did not make it past the legislature's self-imposed deadline to send all statewide bills to the governor's desk.

That's pretty much all you need to know about how Berger and his acolytes roll. No matter how needed and necessary a piece of legislation is, if they can't use (abuse) it to get something else they want, it's no longer worth their effort. The sheer arrogance and selfishness is breathtaking. And it's not like this is a "nice to have" enhancement of our schools, it's a crisis that has deadly consequences if not addressed:

Trump's EO will create numerous "family" detention centers

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Out of the fire and into the frying pan:

Trump's executive order directs the attorney general to promptly file a request with U.S. District Judge Dolly Gree in the Central District of California to modify the Flores Settlement and allow detained migrant families to be held together "throughout the pendency of criminal proceedings ... or other immigration proceedings."

The president directed Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to maintain custody of detained families during criminal proceedings and as their asylum claims are adjudicated. Also, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and the heads of other agencies are ordered to find or construct facilities to house the detained families. Finally, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is directed to prioritize the adjudication of cases involving detained families.

"Finding" such facilities won't be that difficult, considering all the big-box retail stores like Wal-Mart that were closed and virtually abandoned. No doubt many developers and banks holding the notes on these dinosaurs are rubbing their hands together in glee, anticipating that monthly lease payment. And of course these people will have to be fed, so there's a lot of money to be made there, too. And as for those 2,000+ children already caged up, this order does absolutely nothing for them:

Republicans blame Cooper for judicial redistricting confusion

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As usual, Melissa Boughton is on the case:

The Senate voted along party lines Tuesday night to overturn a partial judicial redistricting bill in an apparent attempt to flex its political muscle at Gov. Roy Cooper. Sen. Ralph Hise (R-Mitchell) told his colleagues it took Cooper 243 hours and 20 minutes to veto Senate Bill 757 and that he (Cooper) wanted to make sure he caused confusion for the election.

“I promise you, he knew the moment it passed the first chamber whether or not he was going to veto this bill,” Hise said. “But instead he wanted to create some chaos. … That’s the way this Governor likes to play, so we’re going to send the message back.”

That's right, they are accusing the Governor of following the law, which specifies how much time he has to sign, Veto, or allow a bill to become law without his signature. Make no mistake, those judicial candidates who are forced to refile know exactly who to blame, the meddlers in the General Assembly:

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