Affordable Housing Drives Income Segregation in Schools: Where will that leave Wake County

The location of affordable housing is driven by land-use planning. My new BankTalk entry puts the context of the Wake County school board decisions in a national context. A new study shows that more and more schools are increasingly constituted as private-public schools. These schools have very few poor children. Those districts exist even when a larger MSA is well-off. Certainly, Boston and San Francisco harbor plenty of wealth. Drilling down, it is easy to see that these are places without enough affordable housing. Wake County is ready to go to "neighborhood schools." Does that mean that soon, we'll witness a community that allows its schools to filter opportunity based on class and race? In 2000, Wake had 25 census tracts where fewer than 3 percent of its school-age children lived in poverty. Elementary schools often draw from just a handful of tracts. Those 25 tracts only have 241 children under 18 in poverty - out of more than 10,000. Almost 10 percent of students could potentially live in one of these income-protected areas - a figure that would rank Wake at the high end of the entire country in this unfortunate barometer of social equity.

Comments

This is really the point, isn't it

Does that mean that soon, we'll witness a community that allows its schools to filter opportunity based on class and race?

This is exactly what the Gang of Five is all about.