Goolsby's gig

Former state Sen. Thom Goolsby is on quite a ride since he resigned from the NCGA. He received the Order of the Long Leaf Pine ("Gov. McCrory is bestowing one of NC’s highest honors on a former legislator who defrauded investors,” Progress NC Action tweeted.); he got himself appointed to the UNC Board of Governors by his old Senate colleagues ("Goolsby said he had asked Rabon to nominate him because he's an underhanded schemer who can help bring down higher education higher education is an issue he's very passionate about") and now Thom's got a new gig as a lobbyist for the Internet sweepstakes industry.

Goolsby, who resigned from the legislature last year, announced Thursday that he’ll serve as spokesman for the newly formed N.C. Small Business Coalition. Goolsby is also a registered lobbyist for the group, which is pushing the General Assembly to legalize, regulate and tax internet sweepstakes games.

Given the sordid history of this industry, it seems that Goolsby is a perfect match, so his announcement isn't surprising.

Also not surprising is that one of Thom's old pals just can't wait to dive in and join the Ghoulsby in the muck.

The news release about Goolsby’s new role said that Rep. Harry Warren, a Salisbury Republican, plans to file legislation this session to legalize sweepstakes.

Harry knows how to be lobbied.

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Nice try Harry

“Internet cafes using a sweepstakes promotion sustain thousands of good jobs and have a positive economic impact on our communities,” Warren said in the release. “Our bill will raise revenue for the state’s critical needs and help strengthen these small businesses.”

Riiiight, Harry. If you really cared about jobs, revenue and small business, you had dozens of other opportunities to prove it. Do you really think anyone is stupid enough to believe that this is your real reason for introducing your bill?

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"I will have a priority on building relationships with the minority caucus. I want to put substance behind those campaign speeches." -- Thom Tillis, Nov. 5, 2014