'Lawmaker to push legislation for coal ash cleanup'

WRAL reports

The chairman of the Senate Rules Committee said Tuesday that he is drafting legislation that would force Duke Energy to clean up 14 coal ash ponds around North Carolina like the one that dumped thousands of gallons of toxic sludge into the Dan River last week.

"Just letting them sit there is not the answer to the problem," said Sen. Tom Apodaca, R-Henderson.

Lawmakers, both Republicans and Democrats, have balked at legislation in years past that would have forced power companies to remove the waste from their coal ash ponds.

I am skeptical, as I watched Rachel Maddow on MSNBC do a report last night on the coal ash fiasco in the Dan River in NC. Seems DENR has refused to make Duke Energy do much of anything toward preventing or cleaning up coal ash sites in our state. Why does not Apodaca just convince the DENR folks to do their job and protect the private citizens of NC and not shield the pollutors from an investigation by the feds?

Comments

Letting them pass the cost on to ratepayers

I wonder if that's in the R plan for dealing with this fiasco. Mark my words: We'll all pay, one way or another. Private profits, public risk. It's the Republican way.

You doubt Apodaca's motives?

Yeah, so do we. So do most sentient beings.

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"I will have a priority on building relationships with the minority caucus. I want to put substance behind those campaign speeches." -- Thom Tillis, Nov. 5, 2014

Recycle it!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16849136 This is a link to a study about recycling ash into glass, which immobilizes the toxins, preventing leaching from the glass. (I wonder if they could use it in production of solar panels.) Also many recycle uses in construction, as replacement for Portland Cement in concrete mixtures, bricks that have high insulating properties etc. Why must we have this "resource" stewing next to drinking water sources threatening to poison people when they could do something constructive and get rid of it? Seems like if Duke saw it as a resource they could make money off of they'd clear it out quick!

Great idea.

Thanks for the info. Who knew?

Actually, Duke knows

lots of uses for the stuff: bowling balls, cement, bricks, Asheville's airport ...