The Lt. Governor's race.

Two things have come up in the last 24 hours about the Lt. Governor's race, so I thought I would post them together here. First, COH reports for the three major candidates from the N&O blog (haven't seen any official stats yet. guess we'll have to wait until July 27th).

Dellinger........$520,000
Dalton...........$570,000
Besse...........$101,600
Smathers......$?????

Then, there is the new PPP poll, reported here on BlueNC, but without the Lt. Governor's data included.

Dalton..................11%
Dellinger............... 9%
Smathers.............. 9%
Besse................... 6%
Undecided........... 65%

I don't have a stake in this race yet, perhaps it is my own fault, but I haven't heard or seen anything that has tied me to one candidate. So, count me among the 65%.

A lot of people are going to turn out at that primary, so how are they going to garner their attention? I'm thinking about what the candidate strategy must be and I hate to say it but I would guess it is $$$$ and endorsements. As the race nears, say in the last month or two before the primary, I would think that having some big names endorse you and then having the money to run some ads talking about those endorsements and your record would be critical. I know that Pat is doing a coast-to-mountain tour talking with small groups and that is how politics SHOULD be done. However, we'll see if he come sup short in the $$$ if it actually works in this day and age.

Comments

I would like to see PPP add another name to their list.

"Jack Murphy" or something like that. I'll bet he would poll at 5-9%. Maybe Cindy Murphy for half the respondents.

John Edwards is great!
- Sam Spencer, BlueNC, 7/3/07

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

How about "Family man Robert P."?

I think that would put you up a little higher.

This race will be fun to watch. I think Dellinger and Dalton both have significant ability to raise funds for the race. Pat Smathers could be a serious challenger; I like his message and his style of politics could play well among outsiders. He hurts Dalton as he is also from the western part of the state. Dan Besse is a great issue candidate with a chance to make a dent, but only if he plays nasty and stays away from photographers. Dan, lose the glasses! They didn't work for Erskine, at least.

Staking out ground in an Lt. Gov race is hard. In this primary, I think staking out positions on issues with large voter blocs in order to lock up endorsements may be the way to go, and then following your suggestions on running TV before the primary.

I think you're right about getting and touting endorsements...

Dome had a piece the other day talking about the early backers of Dellinger and Dalton. Dellinger's backers include John Hope Franklin, Branford Marsalis, and Wade Smith. Dalton's are John Belk, Bert Bennett, and Frank Daniels.

Only Two

Pat Smathers and Dan Besse are the only ones to have even come up on my radar as far as platforms go.

It's too bad. Mr. Dalton was at our county convention but maybe he doesn't check his email...

Of course, I could just be heartily confused. It does happen from time to time.

I did run into Mr. Dellinger briefly but I've never heard him speak. Why hasn't he been here?

I don't know. Does anyone know?

Dellinger has been by a few times

but has had a low profile. He was also at Larry Kissell's fundraiser at my house last month.

I doubt if Dalton knows we exist.

On the contrary.

I talked to Dalton at Whole Foods about blogging or an interview and he seemed interested.

John Edwards is great!
- Sam Spencer, BlueNC, 7/3/07

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

That would be great.

I'd really like to hear what the heck is going on in the Senate. Can you track him down and ask again?

Yeah, now that things are settled.

John Edwards is great!
- Sam Spencer, BlueNC, 7/3/07

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

My take on LG

Dan Besse is smart and thoughtful. He may not be tapped into the big money river, but he's learning his way around the interTubes, which will be an asset to any campaign.

Walter Dalton is the quintessential old-school insider who has had a lot to say about how things go in the NC Senate. That alone gives me serious doubts about him.

Hamp Dellinger is the well-connected new-school insider with boundless energy and a solid network of support statewide. He has a strong organization and is pushing hard.

Pat Smathers is a great guy with a host of pragmatic ideas about how the state can and should operate more effectively. He's also working his butt off.

...........................

I'm assuming Dalton and Dellinger see LG as a stepping stone to higher office, but that's less clear to me when it comes to Besse and Smathers. (I'm not making that observation as a criticism. There's a good case to be made for having a long-term succession pipeline.)

...........................

After this comment, I'm planning to stay out of the primary for the most part. Any one of these men would be better than any R who's running. That said, I've pretty much had my fill of old school insiders calling the shots in North Carolina politics. I won't support anyone who's currently in the NC Senate - especially if they're in a leadership role.

Amen to that

On point as always, Anglico. I think you are right about Dalton and Dellinger. I think both want to serve, but they also want to serve "more." And is Hampton going to go with Hamp? I've heard he's been thinking about that. Not sure I agree with that one there.

I hope North Carolina Democrats smell the coffee on old school insiders. Our Senate is acting extremely conservative and making decisions that seem to be counterintuitive; why would Dems want to elect someone out of that crowd for higher office? Sure, he knows the system, and I think that is a plus. But he hasn't used that knowledge in any great extent to push progressive causes (unless you count honoring Earl Scruggs).

the "bench"

we talked a lot in 04 and 05 about developing our democratic bench. This is where that starts to become a boon. The folks who will take the jobs currently held by Dellinger and Smathers for instance SHOULD be Democrats and will provide our next generation of candidates.
Just as Dellinger and Dalton might provide our next generation of gubernatorial candidates. Same thing with someone like Jim Harrell, who served in the House and is running for treasurer - do any of us who have met him think that is his "goal"?

John Edwards is great!
- Sam Spencer, BlueNC, 7/3/07

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

I think its a positive

and a negative.

If they are interested in progressive policies and completely focused on becoming governor by being an amazing lt gov or treasurer then its a huge positive. if they are only going to use the position to campaign for gov and hurt progressive policies its a huge negative.

For instance, I think Janet Cowell running for Treasurer is great in terms of BOTH bench creation and good public policy

"Keep the Faith"

"Keep the Faith"

Ding! We have a winner!

Janet Cowell, while Queen Death to the State Energy Office, would serve the state well with more power (which is kind of what it all comes down to), whichis hopefully of the outcome of what you stress Blue South.

Whether higher hopes is a positive or negative almost depends on the candidate's dogma (or maybe just whether their dogma agrees with mine).

Times, They Do Change -

Don't they?

I like ideas. I like people who listen and understand how things work. Regardless of (-R) opinion - there are things other than money that are important. Some people would say 'more important'.

I need a candidate who knows this. It's a small planet we're living on.

PPP Polling the Lt Gov's race

Robert...the "Jack Murphy" idea would be pretty interesting though it would be more appropriate for a political scientist to conduct it, as opposed to us.

We've been tracking the Lt Gov race for a few months now and every month the results a pretty much the same. Everyone hovering around 9-10% with Walter Dalton usually a point above the rest.

What's unique is that we started a monthly tracking poll in this low intensity race more than a year before the election. That might not mean much now, but it will be fascinating once the election is over. We will have a much better picture as to how/when people make up their minds on who to vote for, and depending on when candidates decide to start actually spending money we can see how money moves votes.

Once other candidate lineup for other council of state races forms we will start other tracking polls. Perhaps by next month we can have a Democrat and Republican track for the State Treasurer's office.

I agree, it will be interesting to see when the electorate

becomes informed and chooses a horse. I'm betting it isn't until the media ads start to hit.

John Edwards is great!
- Sam Spencer, BlueNC, 7/3/07

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

It's call addiction.

And laziness.

Hear me out before you

begin laughing and totally discount what I'm about to say. Actually, you can start laughing anytime you want, just don't drop anything.

I met Hampton at A's house for Larry's thing, and he's got some juice. Just being around him makes you want to say, "Alright! Let's get something done!"

So while we're yakking for a few minutes, I found myself thinking, It must be tough balancing grad school and a candidacy, and then he says something about being 40 and running for Lt. Governor, and my brain just sort of locked for a minute. Hovering somewhere above my confused thoughts, the keeper of my flame whispered, "Find out his secret. Whatever it is, we gotta get some of that."

Aside from the fact that he's the only one I've met in person, I'm going to support him for another reason—durability. Think about it. At the rate he's aging, he's got at least another hundred years of life in him, with 70 to 80 years of productive public service to be utilized. He's like the Honda Accord of candidates.

Okay, in all seriousness, I did pin him down on two issues that he's hot on. I gave him one of those, "If you only had a few seconds to say what you wanted to do as Lt. Governor, what would you say?"

Transparency in government, and raising the age students can drop out of school. The first one's self-explanatory (but we talked about it a little anyway). Then we talked about how many kids drop out under the current system, and how the kids, parents and the system begin grooming for failure at a much earlier age, and everybody's just marking time. Will adding a few more years of required attendance make a difference? I think so, and so does Hampton.

Hahaha...Ahem.

I agree with your opinions quite a bit ...

except for this:

Will adding a few more years of required attendance make a difference? I think so, and so does Hampton.

If they already hate it - you'll just make them hate it more.

Without a love of learning - and real learning taking place - making someone do something, go somewhere, be with people they don't like .... well. I think it's pointless. Find the key for each one in school ... maybe then. Otherwise. . .

Think about this:

forgetting for a moment the limitations not having a high school diploma has on someone entering the workforce, even with legal emancipation, many (most?) employers won't hire a person under the age of eighteen for a full-time position, due to insurance restrictions.

So what do you have? Unemployed teenagers with no plans for college and a couple of years to get into trouble (often serious) before they can be folded into the workforce and begin paying taxes.

The idea isn't necessarily to keep them under the thumb until adulthood, or foist more juvenile delinquents onto the school system, it's to change the way everybody anticipates and plans for an early exit from school.

There's a study:

http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2007/Bills/House/PDF/H452v2.pdf

going on now, so we may know more soon.

I had a long response prepared for this

And then I read what Unique said.

Without a love of learning - and real learning taking place - making someone do something, go somewhere, be with people they don't like .... well. I think it's pointless. Find the key for each one in school ... maybe then. Otherwise. .

That love of learning happens a whole lot earlier than high school. I'm way too tired to go looking for studies other than the Abecedarian right now - but I'm going to just go ahead and say this: if more money and attention were paid to high quality early childhood experiences, there would be fewer students in trouble (academically and legally) in high school.

I'm not advocating for structured school for babies - just high quality opportunities for all children, either in child care settings, or with their parents. Watch the high school drop-out rate, well, drop.

Failing that - alternative opportunities for high school students to work and finish school at the same time must be developed. I have worked with teen mothers who want to stay home and care for their babies (an admirable desire), and yet need to finish school. Options need to be available for students such as these. Options need to be available for students who feel they must help their family with finances. Where I grew up, there were students who went to school from 8 to 12, and worked the rest of the school day. I haven't seen that here; I don't know if it exists. But we have to be willing to think outside of the box.

We can't just think we're going to keep teens under our thumb, because guess what? Ain't gonna happen. Necessarily.

Unfortunately, this is a cycle

Options need to be available for students who feel they must help their family with finances. Where I grew up, there were students who went to school from 8 to 12, and worked the rest of the school day.

of perpetual poverty. In many cases the parents who need the financial help from their children are dropouts themselves, but they fail to make the connection between a lack of education and poor earning potential.

The only way to break that cycle of poverty is to keep the child in school long enough for them to at least learn a trade that will allow them to earn a decent wage. Getting them out of school early so they can make $7.00 hr instead of pushing them a few more years so they can make $15.00 - $20.00 hr is a mistake that will impact the rest of their lives.

Actually, no

Where I grew up, they were apprentice mechanics, electricians, plumbers, etc. High paying trades at the time, man. It was a plan - they graduated with an honest to god diploma instead of a GED, and they were on their way to making more than $15 or $20. I'm still in touch with one of my friends who took that route - he's spent the last 30 years as a highly skilled, highly in demand elevator technician. He earns way more money than I do with my college degree.

Think outside of the box you're in. It's not working at McDonald's. It's educating through work. If the student is working in a restaurant, they're learning business skills as well as waiting tables. Get it? Educating through the work. They're learning kitchen skills.

It works. I've got friends who are living proof.

I Know This, Sc

forgetting for a moment the limitations not having a high school diploma has on someone entering the workforce, even with legal emancipation, many (most?) employers won't hire a person under the age of eighteen for a full-time position, due to insurance restrictions.

But angry, disenfranchised, 18-20 year olds still trying to finish high school and hating it - I'm sorry, dude.

Some people love school no matter what. Some people hate school no matter what.

Me, any day I learned something new was considered a good day and I still feel that way. And Lcloud and I agree on many things - I learned to love learning early ... my elementary teachers were excellent.

Where we differ in opinion is that children starting school earlier and earlier is a good thing. I don't believe it is. If a child has a hellish home life, then yes, it IS better for them to have 'More at 4'; for "normal" kids I don't agree. Many other homeschoolers (et.al.) agree as well, 'Better Late Than Early'.

Stats back up my position - not earlier is better. See ALL the studies out there.

That's all I have to say on it. Don't make students hate school and by default, authority, by making them suffer more. Because I had many friends drop out of school without finishing. Some made it fine in life, others are still struggling. It's more about the person than the place.

Once you've learned how to learn, the world is your oyster. 'School ain't nothin' but a thang.' If you know what I mean.

I don't necessarily mean school early

And Lcloud and I agree on many things - I learned to love learning early ... my elementary teachers were excellent.

Where we differ in opinion is that children starting school earlier and earlier is a good thing. I don't believe it is. If a child has a hellish home life, then yes, it IS better for them to have 'More at 4'; for "normal" kids I don't agree. Many other homeschoolers (et.al.) agree as well, 'Better Late Than Early'.

I really mean high quality early experiences. It's a scientific fact that more brain development happens between birth and age five than any other time in the human life. Love of learning doesn't have to happen in a typical school environment. I don't advocate for universal pre-k or all infants being in school, or anything like that.

What I advocate for is that everyone who has the responsibility of caring for a young child - whether it's the parent or another caregiver - understanding how crucial those early years are to brain development. That doesn't mean there needs to be structured learning - it just means that there should be a lot of interactions between the child and caregiver, there should be a lot of opportunity for the child to safely explore his environment. They should be able to touch, taste, smell, see, and listen to a wide variety of things so that they can know the world. This encourages curiosity, and if encouraged in a safe and nurturing way, instills a thirst for knowledge that is not easily quenched.

I am not against homeschooling at all - in fact, I wish that my life circumstances had allowed me to homeschool my child for at least a few years.

And you're right.

Once you've learned how to learn, the world is your oyster.

And the time that most people learn how to learn is in those first five years of life. That's all I'm saying. (I know - I take a long time to say that. )

I pretty much hated school,

but I finished, because my parents decreed dropping out is not an option.

I also made the Dean's list at Campbell several times, because I was forced to learn the tools I would need at a time I didn't think I needed them.

When a 13 year-old decides he/she can quit in a few years, they go ahead and start quitting then, not later.

Agreed.

But that decision is reached because the system has let them down, and changing the law to make it illegal for them to drop out until they're 17 or 18 isn't going to fix it.

The system has to change, not the age at which a student can leave.

See,

Great minds really do think alike. Thanks for the clarification, L.

You are welcome. :)

Any time.

I've read some studies

that claimed by the 3rd grade you could predict whether a child would graduate from high school or not, mostly by assessing reading comprehension. It's (I believe) the single most important factor in becoming disassociated with the learning environment, and a lot more attention needs to be paid at an early age to reading skills.

We also need to take a long hard look at the intense requirements we place on 8-9th graders, which seems to be the most likely time they will be held back, which is a prime driver of dropping out.

Yes and No, Sc -

3rd grade can be a make or break point. Good students usually continue to be good students.

Students having trouble can really make leaps with proper intervention here. If you continue to pass and they have gaps at this point most often they will fall further and further behind...

But - not always.

Some kids won't even begin to catch on until they are ~10 - which used to be the age of 3rd graders. Is it still? I'm not sure any more.

Every child is different and the factory style institutions we have now just don't work for everyone.

Remember one room school houses? Older kids helped younger kids and quick younger kids got to listen to the older kids lessons ... and so on.

Yes, I know they aren't practical anymore ... at least not 'round here but they were successful for a reason. Many of them discounted by professionals... ahem.

The thing is

it's so much more than school performance that is a predictor of whether or not a child will succeed in school. Certainly, if a child has learned how to learn by the time they've reached the 3rd grade, they will usually do well. (That's the early brain development, etc. that I spoke about previously.)

But the entire milieu of a child's life is incredibly important. If basic needs are not met - such as good food, safe shelter, and a secure environment, the child (and young adult they will become) will not be interested in learning. They will be focused on surviving as best they can. It's simple. If those needs are met, they can focus on other needs, like developing their intellectual, social, and emotional skills - the things that happen in a balanced life, whether it's in a typical school environment, or in a home-school situation, or some combination of the two.

You said you hated school, but stuck with it because your parents insisted. (I'm glad they did, for what it's worth.) Why did you hate it?

Love/Hate

sc hated it.

I hated it for different reasons. (the other kids)
I was there to learn. I loved my teachers. The kids, eh...not so much.

I had some good friends but the pettiness of what passed as 'important'...ooee...no. Football ain't it. Neither were the clothes (although fast cars were .. uh... fun) ;)

My senior year it was like this: 'Put me in a private school or I quit.' And it was just like that. Then the lightbulb went on - 'oh, so this is why they say highschool is the best time of your life'.

I thought highschool was a repeat of elementary so they made sure you learned it. Um, no. You were supposed to learn NEW stuff....amazing.

See,

Socially, adolescence is going to suck. No matter where you are, or how you go through it. Watching someone go through it right now pains me. Academically, you've got to be met where you are. And if you don't already have the tools you need to learn what you need to know, you're out of luck.

I used to think that we could reduce social stress on middle and high school students by making them more the same - like having them wear uniforms, etc. But really - that wouldn't work. The nature of the teenage beast is that they will always stratify themselves socially. What needs to happen is to build the individual's sense of self both in and out of the school environment.

I've thought about this

You said you hated school, but stuck with it because your parents insisted. (I'm glad they did, for what it's worth.) Why did you hate it?

from time to time, and it's not as easy to answer (for me) as it is for some people, but I'll try:

I know you've heard the admonishment, "It's not rocket science" before, but my dad actually was one. An aeronautical engineer, to be specific, who also had an EE license and was even asked to design a bridge or two in his spare time. To be frank, he was brilliant, and contributed greatly to the space program and missile defense (back when it used to work properly).

But my mind has never been oriented to math. I have the aptitude, but the desire has never been there. I do have a high level of empathy and understanding of human behavior, combined with above-average verbal skills and the ability to "create" through writing fiction.

That may sound like bragging, but when I was in school, nobody (especially me) considered those traits as anything more than something that made for an interesting conversationalist. "That's nice, Steve, but what do you plan on doing for a living?"

I always knew that school was necessary, but the closer I got to graduation, the more frustrated I became with not knowing what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. Part of me wanted something simple (even if it didn't pay much), but another part of me wanted to become powerful and influential. That's a painful conflict, and I think it still lingers some.

Ouch

n/t

Wow.

That's hard, Steve. Boys don't get much of a break.

It's hard growing up in the shadow of a brilliant father. I did, too. Much easier for a girl, I imagine, though. I wasn't permitted the luxury of screwing up in school, because my teachers all knew my dad (an attorney, president of the school board, and very active in local politics), and wouldn't hesitate to use the guilt card on me. It worked very well, at the time. I wanted to please everyone. (I got over that, mostly.)

School would be better if students were encouraged to just be who they are, and do not only what they are best at, but what catches their interest.

You are a gifted writer, from what I've seen here. I'd love to see fiction that you've written, if you've got some you'd be willing to share. Sometimes that's more personal than any biography, though.

I'll answer my own question

I hated being picked on at school - and it happened a lot because I was really small, a year younger than most of the kids in my grade, and got better grades than most of them.

But I loved learning, because my parents instilled that early. And if I stayed at home, I had to help my mom clean up after all five of us kids!

I would not have guessed he was 40

and I laughed at you only because you told me not to.

I've heard Dalton

and spoken to Smathers.

Dalton is an excellent speaker. I get the feeling he's the "old guard" presumptive Lt. Gov. pick. Unfortunately, I'm a little knee-jerk wary of that. He sure could have given little Patrick McHserious trouble in the 10th, though, and I wish to God he had gone that way. I think he'd have taken that seat. With all the experience in the Lege he has, and from listening to him, I also think he'd be a great Congressman ... but that's just my uneducated gut feeling/opinion.

Smathers is my pick. He's all about empowering local governments with the tools they need to be effective. He's my favorite for that reason. Pat is smart (Duke), steady and his experience and success in handling the worst possible situations a western NC mayor could have thrown at him (back to back 500 yr floods from hurricanes) really make him a very attractive statewide candidate. He'd hit the ground running in Raleigh. That's probably not something they appreciate too much in Raleigh, ;) but I like it a lot.

I've spoken briefly to Besse and heard him speak at the NC-02 convention. NC could really use another man with his knowledge and passion for the environment and energy issues in Raleigh. Don't know what his chances are for Lt. Gov., but I'd love to see him in the Legislature.

Don't know much about the others running.

"They took all the trees and put them in a tree museum Then they charged the people a dollar 'n a half just to see 'em. Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got till it's gone? They paved paradise and put up a parking lot."

Actually,

I believe Dalton is in the 11th; Rutherford County is split. If I remember correctly, Dalton was considering a run against Charles Taylor at one point. The state and federal district lines just weren't very accomodating for the step up, though, given that three-quarters of his state senate constituents were in the 10th.

He doesn't have to live in the district

The 10th would be a good fit and he lives close enough that nobody would call him a carpetbagger. Welcome to BlueNC....not sure I've seen you about before.

Robin Hayes lied. Nobody died, but thousands of folks lost their jobs.



***************************
Vote Democratic! The ass you save may be your own.

I missed that the first time -

He sure could have given little Patrick McHserious trouble in the 10th, though, and I wish to God he had gone that way.

Damn, but that's our loss.

Anyone think to mention that to him?
I could get behind a conservative (D) to take that one on.

Dalton

I'm not sure if many are still following this thread, but thought I'd make a couple comments in defense of Dalton.

First, a disclaimer: I'm a longtime reader of the site but rarely post, because I work in politics (federal, not state) and often feel that it would be inappropriate. I don't have any vested interest in Dalton's campaign, although I do know him and some of the people with the consulting firm that's helping start up the campaign. I'm writing this solely on my own initiative.

It seems unfair to lay any collective sin of the state Senate on Dalton's shoulders. I'm by no means an expert on the General Assembly, but the general impression I've always received is that Dalton is one of the more progressive members of the elite group of most effective senators. If you set aside a group of your biggest heavyweights in the Senate -- say Basnight, Dalton, Garrou, Hagan, Hoyle, and Rand (there may be others that ought to be included) -- I think objective observers are going to say that Dalton, along with Garrou and Hagan, is one of the progressives. He's been a major proponent of education in the legislature since his earliest terms, and you have to give him some credit for saving Chimney Rock this year, which might be the biggest conservation victory in state history.

Dalton's certainly the most experienced candidate; there's a reason why four of the last five Lieutenant Governors had previously served in the legislature (and the only who didn't, Jim Gardner, was the sole Republican). He's the only candidate with legislative experience on the state level. He's the only candidate who's run a campaign above the municipal level, too, and he's consistently won in a tough, Republican-leaning district. I also like his experience because this next term may provide the first opportunity for the Lt. Gov.'s office to be a major policy player since Gardner was stripped of all his power in the 80s. Because Basnight has had such a tough run of things personally this year, it may be possible that he steps back a bit from his control over the chamber. I strongly believe Dalton is the only candidate with the respect of enough of the state's power players to fill the void and push the state Senate in a progressive direction, much like Hackney in the House.

The finance reports only reinforce the notion that this is realistically a two-way race. I've met all four of the candidates in political settings, and while I genuinely believe they're all nice people with only the best of motivations, Dalton and Dellinger are simply operating on a different level than the others. I don't see how Beese or Smathers will have the resources to compete with the top tier (the current rumor is that Smathers is only going to report something around $20 K). I like Dellinger personally and would understand why someone with his professional background would be a good candidate for Attorney General (which is what he's always wanted to run for), but I don't really see what qualifies him above Dalton for Lt. Governor. Dellinger would be an ideal appointment as U.S. Attorney under a Democratic president, or even for the open Durham DA spot to wait for AG to become open (an aside: it certainly would simplify things and save a lot of primary money if Cooper ran for Senate right now). I just think Dalton is the better choice.

Response

From where I sit, saying that Dalton is the most progressive of that bunch is like Anglico saying that Brownback isnt greedy. Its nice, but it doesnt really mean anything.

While Dalton is the most experienced in the most conventional of terms, it only gives us more to judge him on. And, holding closed door meetings to determine the budget and then coming up with something that makes more Republicans happy than Democrats...well...

While Dalton is absolutely not the driving force behind a lot of the current problems that most of us here have with the Senate, he holds enough sway to carry a big chunk of blame.

As for the money,
#1 It wont determine the race. Look at the polls, everyone is just floating around the margin of error at 10%. Was it Anglico who thought that a fake name would get 5-10% right now? I think he is correct.
#2 There are reasons Dalton and Dellinger have a lot of cash. Frankly, the only amount I really respect is Besse, because its much better than I would have thought. And, I wouldnt sleep on Smathers.
#3 Dalton had $200,000 in the bank at the end of 06, making his amount raised look smaller. Just as important is going to be where that money came from
#4 I believe that the 08 primary election here in NC will be about change and new voices, and I believe that voters will be looking for a significant departure from business as usual both in Washington and in Raleigh. Dalton is business as usual.

"Keep the Faith"

"Keep the Faith"

Thanks for coming by.

It is nice to have people involved with the process stop in to chat. BTW, I wouldn't see anything wrong with your chatting about state issues if you are employed by a federal agency/candidate.

I still haven't decided who I like in the Lt. Governor's race. However, the money inevitability race is one I don't agree with, experience on the other hand is a valid argument in my eyes.

John Edwards is great!
- Sam Spencer, BlueNC, 7/3/07

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

There's nothing wrong with employees talking BUT

I do think that we should have an ethics rule that states that disclosure must be made when talking about a Democratic primary involving your employer.

1 Thessalonians 5:21: But examine everything carefully; hold fast to that which is good.

I always wanted to be the avenging cowboy hero—that lone voice in the wilderness, fighting corruption and evil wherever I found it, and standing for freedom, truth and justice. - Bill Hicks

Thanks for this, DC Heel

I've probably painted Dalton with too broad a brush . . . guilt by association perhaps. That said, I haven't heard anything in the public arena to suggest he's argued against the disastrous positions emerging from the Senate. He's in a leadership role, but whatever leadership being exercised is invisible out here. And believe me, we're watching every move.

You're probably right about Dalton and Dellinger having the inside tracks, certainly based on money alone.

When I heard Pat Smathers talk, he said he was relying on his network in local government (county and municipal) to help build grassroots momentum. That sounded reasonable to me, but still, money matters.

Your comments about Dalton being able to push the Senate into a more progressive direction make sense - if that's what he'd do. I'll keep a close eye on his issues to see if I can find some evidence that might happen. There's no discussion of issues on his website . . . just a list of accomplishments.

Does anyone know Dalton? Can we get him to live-blog with us and answer some of our questions about his positions?

I have an HD for AG sticker/bookmark

I think it was just a trial piece a friend did up for him a while back before anyone was making decisions about where they'd run.

I like Hampton Dellinger. He has a wonderful, engaging personality and he isn't phony. He received a ringing endorsement from my 11-yr-old daughter when she met him at the Young Dems convention in G'boro. Emily is painfully shy and has a difficult time making eye contact with people, especially adults. Hampton wouldn't give up and addressed her as we spoke, making an effort to draw her out and almost forcing her to make eye contact. It worked. After we walked away all she could talk about was how nice he was and how he didn't look through her because she was a kid.

Does this qualify him for Lt. Gov.? I don't know, but I think it says that Hampton is the type of person who can engage and work with even the most diffcult personalities and that is tremendously important when you represent people across a state with a very diverse populace.

Robin Hayes lied. Nobody died, but thousands of folks lost their jobs.



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Vote Democratic! The ass you save may be your own.

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