A Retirement, A Promotion

I removed the link to NC Politics 101 from the "Quick Links" sidebar—it wasn't going anywhere, but you can access what's there using the link above—and replaced it with a new book, "2006 Races." The State Board of Elections will begin posting candidate filings on their website Monday evening, and at first 2006 Races will be a place for me to sort through that information.

But I've got bigger plans. Over the coming nine months, my hope is that the project will develop into a unique resource that will draw people into serious consideration and debate about their November decisions. Here's the book's front page:

This book is a repository for information about political contests leading up to and taking place on November 7, 2006. It's a big topic, and the usefulness of this project will depend on BlueNC members' contributions to it. (If you're logged in, you can add and edit pages.)

The big races will get a lot of coverage on blogs and in the mainstream media. But for many smaller races, this book may be the only independent source of information on the internet. Google and other search engines index these pages, which means that your contributions to these smaller races can play a big role.

We should stick to the facts in this book. Personal blog entries are a good place for opinion, and there's no reason that these pages can't link to blog entries. But these pages will be much more useful if they focus on informing rather than persuading.

As far as I know, nothing like this has ever been attempted at the state and local levels, much less accomplished. I can't think of any reason why it can't be done, though, and I think that the BlueNC community is in a good position to do it. Here we go!

Comments

Good Times

The 2006 Races is a very good idea. Thanks for doing it.

O/T - John Armor, challenger to Charles Taylor, responded to a post at BlogAsheville.

Scrutiny Hooligans - http://www.scrutinyhooligans.us

He's got moxie!

I tell yas, the kid's got a future in politics! One of the reasons House members get unseated so often is their unique ability to meet and greet a significant portion of their constituency (unlike Senators, who have a whole state to cover). Once we have more elected officials who understand blogs, this will probably be even truer. If I were a Representative, I'd have an intern reading local blogs and leaving benign comments under my name. After all, it's hard to hate someone who drives up your webstats!