DAG McCrory's spin doctors make a House call

And Democratic leaders had a few words for the Deputy Assistant Governor:

In anticipation of public outcry, General Assembly legislative assistants were summoned to a meeting held by Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Dale Folwell, in which they were given talking points on how to respond to angry callers. These talking points did not direct callers to individuals with the authority to
change this policy, but said merely to acknowledge the loss of benefits without explanation or assignment of responsibility. In short, these talking points provided political cover for the McCrory administration and legislators who support cutting the benefits.

Here's a thought: if you know something is going to hurt people so much you need to start doing damage control before the pain even begins, then maybe you've made a horrible mistake. Here's the letter in its entirety:

Dear Governor McCrory:

With this letter, we would like to bring to your attention an issue of grave concern for myself and many of our colleagues: the issuance of talking points by your administration to General Assembly staff without notice to or approval from legislative leaders.

As members of the House and Senate Democratic Caucuses, we reserve the right to respond to constituents at our discretion, without undue outside influence or intimidation of our employees.

As a result of the passage of HB 4 in February of this year, nearly 70,000 jobless North Carolinians will begin to lose benefits on June 30. Make no mistake: the loss of these benefits will hurt already struggling families across this state and cause justifiable outrage among those affected.

In anticipation of public outcry, General Assembly legislative assistants were summoned to a meeting held by Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Dale Folwell, in which they were given talking points on how to respond to angry callers. These talking points did not direct callers to individuals with the authority to change this policy, but said merely to acknowledge the loss of benefits without explanation or assignment of responsibility. In short, these talking points provided political cover for the McCrory administration and legislators who support cutting the benefits.

We find it highly inappropriate for any office of your administration to seek to dictate the actions of our staff without our consent or knowledge and hope your office will offer notification to legislators before conducting any such meetings in the future.

The people who voted for this deserve every bit of the anger that will be directed at them, and every Legislator who voted against it should tell each caller right up front that they tried to stop it. That ain't politics, it's transparency.

Comments

Folwell

Ugh.

After all of McCrory's happy talk about not wanting to interfere in the activities in the General Assembly, what does he do? Go around elected officials directly to subordinates? Stunning. Rucho was right. Team McCrory doesn't know squat about management. He's been a lobbyist his whole life.

____________________________________

“Don't tell me what you value, show me your budget, and I'll tell you what you value.”
― Joe Biden

Speaking of lobbying

Sending the former Speaker Pro Tem back over to the House to wield his influence fits that description pretty well. And it smells just as bad.

Did McCrory have the idea? ...

... or did his Budget Director helpfully suggest that tactic? Or did said Budget Director just do it without even bothering to tell McCrory?

Is McCrory even running things in the administration or is he just supposed to smile and hand out a few platitudes to the press?

Inquiring minds want to know. C'mon Raleigh staffers, tell us what's really going on there...