Republicans Want to Curb Capitalism

Republicans in Congress are looking for ways to curb capitalism, at least in one industry. It seems capitalism is cool until it hurts you at the polls. The problem is rising gas prices. As the prices go up, Republican popularity goes down. I guess free enterprise isn't so free, is it fellas?

You've probably heard by now that Hastert and Frist are looking for ways to reduce gas prices before the summer surge hits. According to this Washington Post article, energy experts say it isn't that easy. While no quick fix is given, it does help explain an email sent by Walter Jones discussed yesterday in one of Anglico's diaries.

More on the flip side

Coming clean, sort of

A friend told me recently that I would be waiting a long time if I waited for John Hood, stage manager at Art Pope's Puppetshow, to turn his gaze inward, to actually consider the tragic consequences of the neoconservative reign of terror on America. Indeed, I had promised that I would not link to any of the Puppetmaster's sites (this Art Pope) until I could find evidence of such introspection. Well, I can sometimes be an easy grader, so I hereby declare this morning's commentary sufficient to reestablish the practice of linking to JLF content.

You Thought Chuckie Taylor Couldn't Get Worse

It can't possibly get much worse than being the lone Congressman holding up the placement of a permanent monument to the crew and passenger heroes of flight 93.

For emotional wallop, there are few rivals to the windswept, grassy field outside of Shanksville, Pa., where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed on Sept. 11, 2001.

But for three years, that field has made do with a makeshift monument while one member of Congress, Rep. Charles H. Taylor (R-N.C.), has blocked a $10 million request to buy the land for a permanent memorial to the 40 passengers and crew members who overpowered hijackers bent on crashing their jet into the Capitol or the White House.

The rest of the story on the flip side..

(Updated) Meeting with Brad Miller

Cross Posted at Keeping Reality In Sight
(whenever Blogger starts working again)

I went to the meeting with Brad Miller in Greensboro tonight. Before leaving, I was very nervous. I don’t do very well in groups. Unlike online, I have a really hard time speaking my mind and I almost freeze when I talk to people I don’t know. The whole way there, I kept telling myself: “Don’t get nervous. Just say what you think.”

I was a little early, only one other person was there, but Brad and PJ (his campaign manager) soon arrived. We set up in the back and more people started coming in. I was glad to meet PJ in person finally and I swear it never ceases to amaze me that Brad Miller remembers my name. I grabbed a seat in the corner, as usual, so I could watch everyone and mostly because I wanted to watch how Brad interacted with everyone.

Tool.

What is the deal with this guy? Lone Lawmaker Blocks Flight 93 Monument in Pa.

For emotional wallop, there are few rivals to the windswept, grassy field outside of Shanksville, Pa., where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed on Sept. 11, 2001.

But for three years, that field has made do with a makeshift monument while one member of Congress, Rep. Charles H. Taylor (R-N.C.), has blocked a $10 million request to buy the land for a permanent memorial to the 40 passengers and crew members who overpowered hijackers bent on crashing their jet into the Capitol or the White House.

TTA Deal Struck For Regional Rail

The TTA has just reached an agreement with Norfolk Southern that ensures that they have access to all 28 miles needed to complete the proposed Triangle Regional Rail Line:

The agreements with Norfolk Southern gives the TTA access to the corridors necessary to build the 28-mile rail transit system, which is schedule to have 12 stations connecting Durham, Research Triangle Park, Cary and Raleigh.

Your Internet is at Risk. Time to Act.

dKos: "It's hard to imagine that the Internet, that vast free-flowing world of entertainment, enlightenment, education, and interaction could be fettered, but under this legislation it very well could be. Internet service provision in the U.S. is covered by telecommunications law, and has operated under the idea of "network neutrality." In it's early years, telephone companies provided most Web service, and carried most of the traffic. Because of the nature of laws regulating phone service, Web traffic was handled just like phone traffic, each "call" being equal. That means every page you surf to on the Internet is served up just like any other, as far as your ISP is concerned. You can go from Amazon.com to Aunt Harriet's family history blog equally."

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