Saturday News: The Red (for ed) wave

TEACHER INVOLVEMENT IN NC ELECTION LEFT AN INDELIBLE MARK: To kick off the election campaign, NCAE organized the May rally that brought at least 19,000 teachers and public-education supporters to Raleigh. The event caused at least 42 school districts that educate more than 1 million students to cancel classes for the day. The march helped personalize the concerns teachers had, according to Matt Ellinwood, director of the Education and Law Project at the liberal N.C. Justice Center. Instead of just seeing NCAE complaining, Ellinwood said, some voters connected the issue to someone they knew, such as their own child’s teacher. “When people saw it was their own teacher, someone in their own community ... it was very powerful,” Ellinwood said. As part of NCAE’s post-march push to the election, the group encouraged teachers to become involved in the political process to support legislative candidates.
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/article221371205.html

Without a single shot fired...

Our nation has sent millions of us to fight in wars because, they said, if we didn’t our nation would be overtaken by brutal authoritarian dictators, we’d lose our right to vote, our freedoms, and self-determination. We’d be enslaved, persecuted, like so many others. Tens of thousands of us died fighting Nazis, Fascists, Communists and the like. WWII, Korea, Vietnam…and now Iraq and Afghanistan. Yet, the brutal truth is that without a single shot being fired, we’ve lost our democracy.

Friday News: Free market tyranny

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MOUNTAIN VALLEY PIPELINE APPLIES FOR PERMITS ON NC EXTENSION: The Roanoke Times reports the application filed Tuesday asks for a 73-mile extension for the 300-mile pipeline that is being constructed in West Virginia and Virginia. Mountain Valley proposed the $468 million project called MVP Southgate in April. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission application says the project would start at the current project's endpoint in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. It would run to Alamance County, North Carolina and provide gas to local distribution company PSNC Energy. Opponents fear environmental damage, object to the pipeline's use of eminent domain to obtain private land and question if the pipeline is needed. Mountain Valley says it hopes to start construction on the new project in 2020.
https://www.wral.com/mountain-valley-submits-application-for-n-carolina-pipeline/17978614/

Three Americas? Jobs growth study dispels myths, exposes flaws

A rising tide actually drowns a lot of people:

When such cities as Atlanta and Charlotte enjoyed a job surge in the 20 years that began in 1990, for example, the job gains mostly bypassed residents — often African-American — who had been born into poverty. That is among the findings of a study led by Raj Chetty, a Harvard economist whose newly launched Opportunity Atlas found no association between job growth and economic mobility for poor residents of the affected areas.

“Job growth is not sufficient by itself to create upward mobility,” Chetty said. “It’s almost as though racial disparities have been amplified by job growth.” His finding challenges much of the conventional thinking, of government officials, business executives and economists, that job gains are the surest way to lift up people in impoverished communities.

I think one of the biggest mistakes many government officials make is placing high value on high average salaries, when it comes to recruiting businesses using incentives, anyway. Said company might "create" 300 good jobs, but when 85% of those jobs are taken by people moving to the area for just that reason, what has that accomplished in reducing local unemployment? Not a whole lot. And the more professional skills and certifications those jobs require, the less value to the community that new business represents. I realize many reading this may not agree, but take a quick look at your zip code before attempting to correct me:

Thursday News: Lame Superducks

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GOP LEADERS EYE LAST CHANCE TO PASS VETO-PROOF LEGISLATION: Republican state legislators in North Carolina plan to write more laws this month to take advantage of the last weeks that they hold a veto-proof majority. Legislative leaders have said they planned to take action on voter ID in the November session. Pat Ryan, a spokesman for Senate leader Phil Berger, said Wednesday that staff was just beginning to work on the voter ID and victims’ rights laws, and it was too soon to say what the proposals would look like. The legislature could take up other bills that Republicans want to pass before next year, when Cooper gets the power of vetoes that can stick, said Sen. Floyd McKissick, a Durham Democrat. McKissick said he was prepared for legislation needed for the amendments “and any and all other matters before they lose the supermajority.”
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/article221299965.html

Wednesday News: Say hello to my little Veto

NC DEMOCRATS BREAK SUPERMAJORITIES IN BOTH HOUSES OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY: North Carolina Democrats broke the Republican super-majority in both the state House and state Senate Tuesday night, though some of the races are tight enough to trigger recounts. Going into Tuesday, the GOP held the House 75-45. It looks like it will be 66-54 when a new legislature is seated in January, although a close race in Mecklenburg County could shift one seat. Republicans hold the Senate now 35-15. If unofficial results – with some very thin margins – hold, it will soon be 29-21. Democrats picked up just enough seats to break the Republican super-majority. Sen. Jeff Tarte, R-Mecklenburg, fell by more than 11,000 votes to Natasha Marcus. Sen. Trudy Wade, R-Guilford, also lost a close race, by 763 votes to Michael Garrett.
https://www.wral.com/democrats-break-veto-proof-majority-in-general-assembly/17974495/

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