More misinformation about labor unions

Pervasive ignorance on display:

As it happens, North Carolina is - and has long been, and with good reason - among the many states in the union that already have "right-to-work" laws on the books, which we wholeheartedly endorse. In other words, it is already the case that no one here can require an applicant to join a union as a condition of employment.

For the thousandth time, "right-to-work" laws have nothing to do with protecting workers, and everything to do with protecting management. And if you would pluck your head out of your ass for just a few seconds to ponder how this:

Furthermore, statistics show that North Carolina is already the least unionized of the 50 states, with a tiny 2.9 percent of its work force belonging to labor organizations.

Just may be partly responsible for NC's loss of hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs over the last 4 decades or so, as the owners who had complete control over the fate of their industries decided to take the easy route and make their money importing cheap foreign-made furniture and textiles.

Our aversion to labor unions has done absolutely nothing to boost our economy, and our disregard for the rights of workers has systematically gutted our middle class. These are the results of institutionalized and corporate propaganda-inspired ignorance, and as long as the mainstream media continues to buy the bullshit and print stuff like this, we'll continue the slide into irrelevance.

Comments

True story

A really good friend of mine (who is no longer alive) worked on the assembly line at the Ford F-100 plant in Virginia. Aside from the over-bearing heat during the summer, it was a good job. Great job, actually. Even when I was a Director of Manufacturing here and he was a lowly line-worker there, he still made about $10,000 a year more than me. He was kind enough not to rub it in all the time, but...

Anyway, my friend had some issues, of a psychological nature. He was fastidious, and he thought one of his coworkers was intentionally dropping screws and other small items into his workspace, so he informed management. When this did not produce an immediate shakedown of the entire operation (like I said, he had issues), Bob stopped going to work. He called in sick at first, then he just stopped going out at all.

To make a long depressing story somewhat shorter, his union rep busted his ass trying to get Bob back to work. I think Mike knew that without the job, my buddy would keep going downhill until something bad happened. Which it eventually did. But for about three months, Mike met with management to plead Bob's case, set him up with counseling, took Bob golfing (using me as a lever), and numerous other acts of kindness and concern. A few years later, Bob's heart failed him at the age of 39 (I think), due to an out-of-control substance abuse problem coupled with mismanagement of diabetes.

The moral of this story: when you're part of a union, you've got somebody watching your back. You're never alone, even when you screw up royally. How many of you can say that? How many of you can walk into your boss' office, and know (for certain) that you've got a whole bunch of people standing there with you, in spirit if not in person?

I'll tell you this, one of the main reasons we've allowed this anti-unionism to prosper in this state is because we don't have respect for each other. We don't think our fellow workers are smart enough or trustworthy enough to wield any power, and that is a shame.

Right-To-Freeload....

...is what it should be called. You can work in a union shop in NC, refuse to join the union, then get the same pay and health care benefits that the union negotiated for.

Course then you can register Republican, tell everyone how you're a self-made man, and scream bloody murder at those freeloaders who draw a government check.

This is true

But while these non-union employees might be reaping the benefits of others' sacrifices in the short term, in the long term, they're also contributing to a darker future for all of us.

When workers have no voice at all in the equation, there's nobody to call bullshit on bad decisions by management.