Bush Administration

Voter suppression judge gives pass to Alamance County Sheriff

Choosing to ignore blatant racial profiling by law enforcement:

The Justice Department also alleged that Johnson said “bring me some Mexicans” during a staff meeting in January 2007. “In eliciting this statement, the government made no effort to provide any context, and none was given,” Schroeder wrote in his opinion. “The court is doubtful that the claimed statement was made, especially in the unsupported context.” Johnson denied making the statement.

Two sheriff’s employees testified that Johnson said to “go get those/some Mexicans,” but both deputies said the statements were made in reference to a Mexican gang that the sheriff’s office was investigating for possible criminal activity, according to the opinion. “It does not indicate that the sheriff ever directed his deputies to arrest individuals simply because they were from Mexico or were Hispanic,” Schroeder wrote.

Bolding mine. This judge is beginning to sound more like a defense attorney representing plainly guilty parties than an objective observer. In one breath he "doubts" the racist statement was made, and in another breath he admits it probably was but was simply misunderstood. I'm sure nobody reading this would want a Federal judge who was a rubber stamp for the DOJ. But we also don't need one with barely-concealed contempt for the agency, especially when it comes to Civil Rights issues. Needless to say, this racial profiling decision gives me even more reason to believe Schroeder will rule in favor of the GOP vote suppressors in the next few weeks, so the time to begin preparing the appeal is yesterday.

Subscribe to RSS - Bush Administration