Christian extremists

Tarheel Taliban: Mark Robinson to attend Christo-Fascist gathering

NC's biggest mistake is getting bigger:

New Lt. Governor Mark Robinson is, like his predecessor Dan Forest, no stranger to controversy. Next month he’ll be proving it again, following in Forest’s footsteps as a keynote speaker for a North Carolina Renewal Project event in Raleigh.

As Policy Watch reported in 2019, the American Renewal Project holds similar expense-paid private events across the country for “church and ministry leaders, and their spouses.” Its goal, as stated by founder David Lane, is to “engage the church in a culture war for religious liberty, to restore America to our Judeo-Christian heritage and to re-establish a Christian culture.”

This isn't just some sort of fringe group waving brochures from a street corner; they are actively (and successfully) engaging in a political jihad to take over the government. Not only is a woman's right to choose at stake, but LGBTQ folks are particularly in their cross-hairs:

Theocracy, by any other name: Government-funded discrimination in foster care

Weren't they just complaining about the Left indoctrinating children?

The reality of what “religious liberty” means in the eyes of the American Christian right continues to come into sharper focus. As the good people at People for the American Way report, the Trump administration’s Department of Health and Human Services has granted a waiver to the state of South Carolina so that it can dispense taxpayer dollars to a “child welfare agency” that refuses to place foster children in any homes that do not share the group’s Christian evangelical views.

“Under Miracle Hill’s policies, not only Jews are rejected” as potential mentors and foster parents, reported the Religion News Service. “Muslims, Hindus and atheists are also barred from fostering or mentoring children in the nonprofit’s programs; so too are Catholics.” Don’t even ask about same-sex couples, even if they’re Protestant. Miracle Hill has reportedly received millions of dollars from the state and federal governments."

We sure do hear a lot about how Christian groups help people. But what you don't hear about are the strings that are almost always attached. Ritualized prayer, access to mainstream fiction and the Internet denied, and even compulsory bible study when they can get away with it. It happens a *lot* more than you would think, and government generally turns a blind eye because resources to help people are limited. But in this case, those limited resources, which should only be spent on secular programs, are being funneled into a denomination-specific religious operation. They've actually been doing this since the late 1980's, but the Obama administration (rightfully) clarified the language of the Federal funding requirement a few years ago:

The fine line between a Christian "church" and a cult

Resorting to physical violence is one big indicator the line's been crossed:

A North Carolina man thought he was "going to die" when members of his evangelical church beat and choked him for two hours to expel his "homosexual demons," he testified Thursday.

Matthew Fenner was the first person to take the stand in the assault and kidnapping trial of Brooke Covington, a 58-year-old minister at Word of Faith Fellowship in Spindale, North Carolina. Fenner, 23, said Covington was the leader in a 2013 beating involving numerous congregants. He said Covington pointed out his sexual orientation, saying, "God said there is something wrong in your life."

This is pretty horrific, but what's even more horrible is the fact the harshest punishment that might be brought in this court case is two years in prison. That's *if* she's convicted on the two counts (kidnapping and assault) she's charged with. And if it wasn't for the diligence of the Associated Press, nothing would have happened:

The archetype of bad McCrory hires: Todd Chasteen for state Board of Education

Protégé of Franklin Graham is the last person who should be nominated:

“We should reject Governor McCrory’s recent nomination of Wataugan J. Todd Chasteen to the North Carolina Board of Education,” said Appalachian State University English professor Craig Fischer at a public forum at the university earlier this week, objecting to Chasteen’s lack of experience in public education.

“Chasteen sided with would-be censors during last year’s battle over keeping Isabel Allende’s The House of the Spirits in the sophomore English Honors curriculum at Watauga High,” Fischer added. “He spoke on behalf of banning the book at a February 10, 2014 school board local forum about the controversy, claiming–inaccurately–that Allende’s book is full of ‘deviancy’ and child pornography.”

I'm not sure how deeply the (state) Board of Education is involved in setting curricula or reading materials for schools state-wide, but this guy has no business making any of those choices. What little experience he has is steeped in religious doctrine:

Subscribe to RSS - Christian extremists