civil rights

Marking the 57th Anniversary of the Greensboro Sit-In

Civil rights were not a gift, they had to be secured:

It’s a testament to what they achieved, in a way, that so many today have no knowledge of the Sit In Movement. It’s what happens when you achieve something so good, so transformative, that in a couple of generations the young people can’t comprehend a time when it was vastly different.

That four young men decided that they would walk in to the Woolworth’s on Elm Street in Greensboro on Feb. 1, 1960 and simply ask to be served at the lunch counter did, in fact, change America. Similar protests spread within days across the state, and across the Deep South within a week. Though the department store owners held firm that winter and into the spring, by late summer they realized that arc of history was bending toward justice.

When I think of what these four brave men endured at the hands of their white oppressors, it makes me feel ashamed of my race. But that's good, it makes us learn. We will never again just stand by while bigots attack, we will stand between them and speak truth to evil intent.

Libertarians Say Repeal HB2

The Libertarian Party of North Carolina has joined the growing list of organizations calling for the repeal of House Bill 2.

"The state has no authority to determine gender," the unanimous resolution states. HB 2 also “unduly intrudes state authority into local decision-making and unreasonably limits the ability of the citizens ... to govern themselves.”

In addition, the bill reduces individual rights because it “bans citizens from using state courts to remedy discrimination”

Demonstrators march in Bladenboro for Lennon Lacy

Too many questions still remain:

Hundreds of protesters joined with the state chapter of the NAACP in a march in Bladenboro to call for a thorough federal investigation of a black teen whose death was ruled a suicide.

Lacy was found last summer hanging from a noose fashioned from two belts and tied to a swing set in Bladenboro. Family members and NAACP officials have called his death a "possible race-based homicide" and said local authorities rushed to reach a conclusion and didn't fully investigate the case.

Pretty sure it was a belt and a dog leash, neither of which belonged to the victim. It's inconsistencies in the media coverage like that which scream for a much more detailed investigation, and any embarrassment on the part of local law enforcement falls on their shoulders alone.

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