First in Mercenaries

Above the law: Tiger Swan mercenaries get free pass from North Dakota judge

Blurring the lines between public and private law enforcement:

A North Dakota judge has refused to reopen a lawsuit that state regulators filed against a North Carolina-based private security firm accused of using heavy-handed tactics against people protesting the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline. Judge John Grinsteiner's decision Monday ends the yearlong dispute in state district court, but doesn't resolve a disagreement over whether TigerSwan was conducting work that required a license in North Dakota.

North Dakota's Private Investigative and Security Board plans to appeal the case's dismissal to the state Supreme Court, attorney Monte Rogneby said. Should that fail, the board can still pursue tens of thousands of dollars in fines against TigerSwan through an administrative process.

Before we proceed, just a side-note: This North Dakota government regulatory board is exactly the kind of organization groups like Civitas want to abolish, because they exert control over private businesses by requiring licenses and permits and such. But in the case of Tiger Swan, they not only ignore such boards, they infiltrate and influence the operations of legitimate law enforcement agencies:

Mercenaries providing security at Carter-Finley?

Sometimes the cure is worse than the illness:

NC State is ramping up security at Carter Finley Stadium for its final two home games.

School officials say there will be increased security and law enforcement officers inside and outside the stadium, in the parking lots and in areas surrounding the stadium as a precaution.

I hesitated posting this, because a) I could very easily be mistaken, and b) If I'm not mistaken, publicizing Tiger Swan's involvement could (theoretically) cause additional security issues at the events in question. But people deserve to know if private military contractors are operating in their presence.

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