Municipal Elections

Resisting in the streets and at the table

The term "Iconic" comes to mind...

One hour left before candidate filing in NC municipal elections closes

The clock is ticking:

Candidates seeking to file for the 2017 municipal elections will be able to file their notice of candidacy at their county board of elections starting at 12:00 noon on Friday July 7, 2017 and ending at 12:00 noon on Friday, July 21. To file, a candidate will need to submit a Notice of Candidacy to their county board of elections either by mail or in person during the filing period. In order to prevent the premature filing of the form, the Notice of Candidacy forms will be available approximately two weeks prior to the start of candidate filing. The filing form and the requisite filing fee must be received by the county board of elections before the filing period ends.

Sorry about the last-minute thing, but (for some reason) I thought filing ended at 5:00 p.m.

Asheville City Council next target of GOP meddling

If you can't be popular, be a bully:

Republican Sen. Chuck Edwards, who represents a small part of South Asheville, sent an email to Mayor Esther Manheimer Tuesday afternoon saying he was "confident that this measure" to require districts in council elections would pass the General Assembly in Raleigh, unlike one attempted by his powerful predecessor.

Apodaca, who was chairman of the powerful rules committee, said he wanted to change the fact that no council member had been elected for more than a decade from South Asheville, which has the highest number of Republicans in the city. Tuesday, Edwards said his "actions are the result of trends taking place in municipalities as well as a great deal of feedback from citizens of Buncombe County."

Asheville needs to fight this the way Greensboro did, if it comes down to it. And I wouldn't trust Republicans in the General Assembly to respect any District maps developed by the City, because they are constitutionally incapable of keeping their grubby fingers from redrawing maps, and double-bunking is bound to occur. Which, in case you're not paying attention, is one way the Legislature undermines the will of the people, by making them choose which one of their 2-3 favorites gets to remain in office.

Trudy Wade's conquest of Greensboro City Council

Rigging the game in favor of Republicans:

If the city had six or seven council districts, the maps could be carved up in a way that overloads a handful of districts with Democrats, making the remaining districts at least more competitive for Republicans.

The General Assembly used both of those techniques — eliminating at-large seats and clumping together Democrats — when it redrew the county commissioner districts.

Proving there's nothing too unethical for Republicans to contemplate, when they smell a potential power grab. It also proves land developers are not about to give up their dominating influence over Greensboro's affairs, regardless of what the people actually want:

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