NC Hometicks

Durham makes the wrong list on affordable housing

The free market of real estate sales takes no prisoners:

Ten years after the housing collapse during the Great Recession, a new and different housing crisis has emerged. Back then, people were losing their homes as home values crashed and homeowners went underwater. Today, home values have rebounded, but people who want to buy a new home are often priced out of the market. There are too few homes and too many potential buyers.

This isn't just a problem in San Francisco or New York, where home prices and rents have gone sky-high. It is also a problem in midsized, fast-growing cities farther inland, like Des Moines, Iowa; Durham, N.C.; and Boise, Idaho. In Boise, an analysis by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development showed there is a demand for more than 10 times the number of homes being built right now.

Quick NIMBY anecdote: My town government is having a tense struggle (with me right in the middle) with some neighborhoods over new construction projects, and one big takeaway is: They definitely don't want anything resembling "affordable housing." No apartment buildings, no modest townhomes (less than $200,000). Of course, many of these folks would prefer to see nothing at all built there, but if it's happening, they want to make sure no poor people, or even lower middle class, move in next door. Here's more about the problem, and the conundrum of not having nearly enough homes for the people who need them:

NC Hometicks give astro-turfing another try

"Looking out" for homeowners, when they're not ripping them off:

Sen. Harry Brown, R-Onslow; Rep. Phil Shepard, R-Onslow; Rep. George Cleveland, R-Onslow; and Rep. Chris Millis, R-Onslow and Pender are slated to attend, alliance representative Paul Mott said.

He said the event is not about politics. “Our goal is to advocate for homeowners’ rights at the legislature,” Mott said. “This goal is to be a friendly conversation between homeowners and their elected officials. We’ll keep the questions geared toward homeowners’ issues.”

Yeah, that sounds nice. Unfortunately, Mott's "real" job is working for Cornerstone Solutions, whom the NC Realtors rely on for political success:

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