NC prisons

NC's African-American incarceration rate is staggering

This doesn't happen by accident, it's a systemic problem:

13 – North Carolina has the 13th largest prison population in the country

37,104 – The number of people in prison in North Carolina as of May 2018

1 in 40 – The number of Black men in North Carolina who were imprisoned as of 2016

52.9 percent – While Black people made up only 21.5 percent of the state’s adult population in 2016, they accounted for more than half (52.9%) of the state’s prison population

That's roughly 18,550 black North Carolinians behind bars, and the vast majority of them are there for non-violent crimes. And with the penny-pinching associated with public defender funding, many of those currently incarcerated have legitimate Constitutional concerns about their treatment. But I'll let the public defenders themselves explain why that's wrong:

Rally in Raleigh to protest inhumane immigrant detention process

Trying to survive the sticky net of ICE roundups:

Immigrant rights groups will hold a press conference and rally to demand an end to immigrant detention Raleigh, NC – On Friday, immigrant rights groups and families of people in detention will hold a press conference and rally at the Wake County Public Safety Center to demand an end to immigrant detention. The action is a part of the Southeast Immigrant Rights Network month of action to denounce the abusive and inhumane immigration detention system. With a string of recent hunger strikes inside detention and 10 deaths in Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody since the start of the fiscal year, immigration detention continues to be exposed as a fatally flawed system that needs to be shut down.

Consider this: If one of your children or another family member was incarcerated, and not given a bail hearing or any other avenue to seek freedom or even information about their legal situation, and were kept behind bars for months with no idea when they might be released, you would understandably be outraged and banging down the institutional doors to straighten that out. There are literally thousands of families going through that right now, but their immigration status makes them vulnerable to what we would call unconstitutional treatment. How can that be? How can we have rights for some but not others? I would argue a Constitution that doesn't cover everybody actually covers nobody. Habits are hard to break, and it's only a matter of time before US citizens are also detained indefinitely. Here are the details of the rally:

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