NCGA

NC GOP's relentless attack on college professor

Apparently shutting down the Center is not enough punishment for speaking out:

Pretty sure this effort is mostly to distract from the embarrassing antics of the GOP Clown Car that skidded into town:

And now Trudy Wade is going after teachers

NC GOP acting more and more like a third world tyranny:

“What they do on their own time is their right and their business,” Wells said. “But what they do when they’re being paid to be working and what they do with public facilities and resources, we should have one set of rules for that.” Senate Bill 480 is co-sponsored Wells and Sens. Trudy Wade (R-Guilford) and Andrew Brock (R-Davie).

“I think it could have a chilling effect,” Warren said. “Teachers aren’t the most politically active people anyway, but right now there are a lot of people who are afraid for their jobs if they speak out on some of these issues. This could just make that worse.”

I'll just repost a comment I left on Facebook and leave it at that: "What they do on their own time? What time is that, pray tell? The thirty minutes left before bedtime after grading papers and preparing lesson plans for the next day? And what are these "supplies" to which you refer? You mean the supplies teachers have been forced to purchase out of their own pockets because two-faced politicians keep cutting the funding for those things? You've done enough damage to teachers already, give it a fricking rest."

Supreme Court rejects Alabama gerrymandering decision

There's more than one way to dilute someone's voting voice:

The justices split 5-4 across ideological lines in ruling that a three-judge panel did not properly consider complaints that state officials illegally packed black voters into too few voting districts. Writing for the court, Justice Stephen Breyer said the lower court should have reviewed claims of racial gerrymandering on a district-by-district level, not just statewide.

“The Alabama and North Carolina redistricting cases involve different questions of law, and legislative leaders do not believe today’s Supreme Court decision impacts the North Carolina case,” Phil Berger, N.C. Senate president pro tempore, and Tim Moore, the N.C. House speaker, said in a joint statement.

Nice try, BergerMoore. The Justices' concerns in the Alabama case, and their subsequent dissatisfaction with the lower court's ruling, are both very pertinent to North Carolina's redistricting mess. Here's an excerpt (fat pdf) from our own Supreme Court's flawed opinion allowing the districts to stand:

Common Core & Ft Bragg

When I had the opportunity to speak at NCGA's Education hearing on the Common Core (CC), one of the points I made was that having the same expectations nation-wide was not a Communist plot but merely common sense. My family moved a lot during my childhood. Although we were not a military family, in 12 years of public education I attended 10 schools in 4 states.

GOP to cancer patients: Your pain means nothing to us

The hopes for medical marijuana just died:

Despite pleas from a number of people who testified that medical cannabis has helped treat either themselves or loved ones, the committee rejected legislation that would have legalized marijuana use for certain patients.

"Legalizing marijuana for medical purposes is both unnecessary and a slippery slope," said Tammy Fitzgerald, executive director of the North Carolina Values Coalition. "We oppose House Bill 78. It could open the door to legalizing marijuana for recreational use." Fitzgerald was one of three speakers to urge rejection of the medical marijuana bill, all of them representing socially conservative groups that frequently lobby lawmakers on issues ranging from abortion to alcohol control to gay marriage.

Tami Fitzgerald is a blight on humanity. The only "values" she represents are to cause as much pain and suffering as she can before the karma wheel comes along to crush her flat.

Coal Ash Wednesday: A fait accompli for Lee County

County Manager breaks the bad news:

If residents want to see who voted to place coal ash in Lee County, go to the North Carolina Legislature’s webpage and pull Senate Bill 729 from the 2014 session. Make sure you see who sponsored the bill. They are the ones who developed the plans to place coal ash in clay mine pits in North Carolina. Because Lee County is the clay/brick capital of North Carolina, the bill gave Duke the right to place coal ash in the county without approval of the local government.

A vote to move forward on the recent financial agreement offered by Duke is not a vote to put the coal ash in Lee County – that already was done by the legislature, just like fracking. A vote in favor of the agreement is to accept money from Duke that will hopefully help the community overcome the stigma of having a coal ash storage facility. Voting against the agreement will mean we won't get the money and coal ash will, in all likelihood, come anyway.

My initial reaction to this op-ed was to say, "It ain't over 'til it's over." Republicans in the General Assembly might consider themselves all-powerful, but the courts so far have shown that feeling to be mistaken. Several of their more outrageous moves have been delayed, blocked, or simply ruled unconstitutional. That being said, I'm not the one trying to manage a county on what has to be a shoestring budget. And he's right about the legislation he referenced:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Why worry about substance when empty rhetoric is so readily available?

The Affordable Care Act already does those things, and does them so well people like you are forced to talk about some nebulous other program that will supposedly eclipse it. It's time to find a new monster to fear, because Americans have outgrown this scary bedtime story.

GOP jobs plan: Take your "Sleepy Hollow" somewhere else

Wilmywood fading into film industry obscurity:

Fox Television Group chairman Dana Walden had previously told the StarNews that if the show was renewed for a third season, it would move production to the Atlanta area in the wake of North Carolina’s new grant program that caps the amount of money projects can earn at $5 million.
Industry members say $5 million is considerably less than the 25 percent rebate of total spending the show got for each of its first two seasons.

According to several local crew members, people who worked on the show in Wilmington may have opportunities to apply for jobs whenever and wherever it resumes production. As of now, however, nothing is confirmed.

Cue the right-wing Twit brigade to proclaim: "Nobody is losing their jobs! They can keep them if they want to!" If they want to move to Atlanta, that is, where there are tens of thousands of unemployed and underemployed workers that will be scrambling to take those jobs away from the NC folks who do go there. Gee thanks.

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