NCGA

New report highlights the economic benefits of clean energy

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And rural areas are getting a large slice of that pie:

A new report shows the economic impact of more than a decade of clean energy investment in the state. The study from the North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association finds clean energy development projects generated more than $28.2 billion dollars statewide since 2007.

Clean energy projects can be a boon to rural, low-income counties. The report finds rural Eastern counties have benefitted the most. Duplin and Robeson counties lead the state with more than $650 million dollars of clean energy investment apiece.

In place of my normal long-winded spiel, I'll quote myself from almost four years ago:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

What the GOP wanted all along:

Widening the gap between the Two Americas.

The State of Rape: Consent bill dies in NC Senate committee

There is absolutely no excuse for this:

A bill that would make it illegal to continue to have sex with someone who told the other person to stop has died in a state Senate committee.

North Carolina may remain the only state in the country where someone cannot be charged with rape for continuing to have sex with a partner who told them to stop. It stems from a 40-year-old legal precedent.

And of course included in that bill was a section dealing with rapists having their way with women too drunk or drugged to know what was happening. The bill should have sailed out of committee with a unanimous vote, out of both houses the same way, and on the Governor's desk before the ink had dried. But apparently this is 1519 instead of 2019.

The Second Chance Act will improve lives and reduce recidivism

Rehabilitation and reintegration into society are not just words:

Social, economic and environmental factors play a bigger role in a person’s health outcomes, they argue. Housing, employment, education, transportation and access to healthy food are known as “social determinants of health.”

But people with criminal records face barriers to accessing some key health determinants, such as housing and employment. The “Second Chance Act” moving through the North Carolina legislature would help remove some barriers for people with certain nonviolent criminal records and make it easier for these folks to access the things that make them healthier.

Everybody reading this has broken the law at one point or another. And most of us have actually endangered the lives of others in doing so (driving while impaired, excessive speeding). Making a living and caring for your family is difficult enough in today's economy, and it's virtually impossible to do so with a criminal record. This bill would provide some relief from that:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

More notes from the Kakistocracy:

Well, at least she didn't push any Amway products on them...

Neo-Confederates clash with students (again) in Chapel Hill

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And once again, dude shows up with a gun and is allowed to leave with it:

After two incidents in which opponents pushed each other, Chapel Hill police brought in portable plastic barriers to separate the two groups. “You are evil and nasty,” Wendy Hayslett, a “Confederate” protester told the students and their supporters, shouting into a bullhorn. The anti-racists answered with chants of “Go home, Nazis.”

One protester arrived late with a handgun holstered on his hip. He carried a Confederate flag and a sign that said, “WARNING. LEAVE SOUTHERN MONUMENTS ALONE.” A member of the Heirs group invited him to join them, but police cautioned him he could not come onto the site with the gun. He left and came back without it.

Watch the video. They got into several scuffles before the police showed up and placed barriers between them. But here's the kicker: The Town of Chapel Hill issued the Confederate group a permit, so they knew when and where this was going to happen. Police should have been there before this began, not after the pushing and shoving took place. Even the Lost Cause Snowflakes were surprised at that oversight:

Everything that's wrong with NC Republicans in one picture

The NC GOP's sustained attack on local control

Municipal governments may soon be just a fond memory:

These bills significantly favor the interests of homebuilders and Realtors, but at what would be the great expense of communities across North Carolina, and here in Moore County. One of those bills we’ve already discussed here: State Sen. Tom McInnis’ bill preventing municipalities from regulating tree removal. McInnis says he’s no longer pushing his bill, but it remains ominously in the mix.

Other pending legislation is even more grievous. One bill would prohibit municipalities from regulating the minimum square footage of homes, something that has long been the purview of local government. Another bill would roll back reasons a municipal code enforcement officer may consider a building unsafe. And still another would extend the tax exemption to homebuilders from three to five years for unsold houses, and restrict a town’s ability to make a builder clean up a dilapidated site that violates an ordinance.

I've been dealing with the issue of property rights (heavily) for the last 15 months or so, and I can safely say it's a tremendous balancing act. But one thing is certain; when citizen groups get involved in the process (as opposed to one or two ranters) on a local level, they can influence said process. Nobody gets everything they want, but that is itself a sign that property rights are being respected. But apparently some Legislators simply do not understand that:

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