Nonviolent protests

Above the law: Tiger Swan mercenaries get free pass from North Dakota judge

Blurring the lines between public and private law enforcement:

A North Dakota judge has refused to reopen a lawsuit that state regulators filed against a North Carolina-based private security firm accused of using heavy-handed tactics against people protesting the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline. Judge John Grinsteiner's decision Monday ends the yearlong dispute in state district court, but doesn't resolve a disagreement over whether TigerSwan was conducting work that required a license in North Dakota.

North Dakota's Private Investigative and Security Board plans to appeal the case's dismissal to the state Supreme Court, attorney Monte Rogneby said. Should that fail, the board can still pursue tens of thousands of dollars in fines against TigerSwan through an administrative process.

Before we proceed, just a side-note: This North Dakota government regulatory board is exactly the kind of organization groups like Civitas want to abolish, because they exert control over private businesses by requiring licenses and permits and such. But in the case of Tiger Swan, they not only ignore such boards, they infiltrate and influence the operations of legitimate law enforcement agencies:

Note to school administrators: Don't punish these kids

Because they are doing what you have failed to do:

High school principals made a robo call to parents this week telling them the event planned by CHC Enough, a student-led anti-gun violence organization, would be viewed as a school disruption and violation of the Student Code of Conduct.

"We fully support student voice, however it must be done in a way that is safe and doesn’t negatively impact education," the principals said in their call. "The April 20 walkout as currently promoted is a disruption to the school day, and a violation of the student code of conduct - which will be enforced."

This isn't just a local thing, the entire world is watching. It's the anniversary of the Columbine school shooting, which took place 19 years ago, and should have been a catalyst for changes to laws surrounding the purchase of deadly weapons. Yet we still have loosely-regulated gun shows and pretty much no control over the sales of "long guns." In a word, nothing happened. It's that failure of society and the government it relies upon that has brought this about, and punishing those students for what amounts to protecting their own lives would be shameful. And if you want to see the quintessence of hypocrisy, check this out:

NC's "hit and kill" bill one of many designed to stifle protests

And of course it was started by Big Oil protecting its profits:

State lawmakers in Florida, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Texas also considered similar measures, which the American Civil Liberties Union nicknamed "hit and kill" bills. The bills were part of a broader package of anti-protest legislation floated in at least 19 states after an upsurge in activism over the last year.

Of the half-dozen states entertaining proposals to shield drivers who hit protesters, North Carolina is the one where it has the best chance of passing. And despite the violence that recently unfolded in Virginia, the bill's sponsors have come to its defense, although its prospects appear to have dimmed.

My reference to Big Oil in the intro has to do with how protesters often use their bodies to block access to pipeline or fracking sites, where contractors have gotten into the habit of just rolling slowly through the crowd, like they're trying to push sheep off the road. But even North Dakota balked at passing such an ill-advised law:

Kneeling band members reveal bigotry and hatred at ECU

More than enough shame to go around:

After a public records request, the News & Observer reviewed more than 450 pages of emails to and from Staton following the Oct. 1 game in Greenville. More than a dozen band members knelt during the playing of the national anthem, joining in a national wave of protests against police shootings of African-Americans. The ECU protest elicited a chorus of boos from fans in the stadium, and the band had to have a police escort from the game after members were spat on and pelted with trash.

Who would do that? Seriously, who would spit on somebody else at a public event? Who would consider that a proper way to show your disagreement with somebody else's behavior? I tell you who would do that, the same people who would label another as a "thug" simply based on the color of that person's skin. This sounds like something that would have happened during the 50's and 60's desegregation era, not fifty years later. And leave it to the biggest bigots of all to use their family money to pressure the University:

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