Pat McCrory

State perks

To describe the NC GOP as “conservative” is to distort the word into oblivion, especially in the area of the environment. Nowhere is this more evident than in their rapacious stewardship of our state parks.

I am writing this post on a rainy day at the David Crockett State Park in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, one of nearly 59 magnificent state parks in Tennessee. Two days ago, we were in Fort Mountain State Park in Georgia, one of 65 in that state. The day before that, we were at Table Rock State Park in South Carolina, one of 47 state parks in that tiny state.

We had hoped to stay in North Carolina on our trip from Chapel Hill, but the pickings were very slim. Remarkably, our beautiful state has only 40 state parks, and once you get west of Asheville, there are none available for camping. This is a problem that’s going to get worse before it gets better.

The Scotch Bonnet dilemma

When former Governor Mike Easley of North Carolina bought into Cannonsgate in Carteret County years ago, a developer and or real estate broker got giddy. The purchase put prestige and a big commission into someone’s pocket. Easley’s .36 acre waterfront lot according to Carteret County Assistant Tax Administrator Ralph Foster, was valued at $1,198,245.00 one year later. Easley paid $549,880.00 for a patch of sand. Assuming the standard 6% commission, $32,992.80 was a nice payday.

Screw you, McCrory

Our governor is dragging his feet on issuing pardons for Henry Lee McCollum and Leon Brown, two North Carolina men who served 30 years in prison for a crime they did not commit. Each man received a whopping $45 in compensation for the wrongful conviction. The men have been free for seven months, but McCrory can't bring himself to decide what to do. Seven goddamn months and not a peep from the governor.

Pat McCrory's not-so-magnificent economic recovery

For all of Pat McCrory's talk about the so-called Carolina Comeback, you'd think we'd be dancin' in the streets from joy about the economic conditions here in the Old North State. Unfortunately, hizzoner can't tell the difference between delusion and reality, as this report from the Budget and Tax Center shows:

Growth without prosperity: Economic output has rebounded nicely since the worst days of the recession, but it is not translating into larger paychecks for many North Carolinians. Adjusting for inflation, gross state product—which measures the value of all goods and services sold—is up 18.5% compared to 2007, but wages are actually down slightly.

Nothing to see here: McCrory ethics investigation

Pat McCrory's pattern of deception around his financial contributions continues, with no sign of the "transparency" that candidate McCrory promised way back when. With a simple, written directive from the governor's office, all of the Ethics Commission proceedings currently underway could be made public.

Fat chance.

McCrory's ethical troubles continue

If you're following the ethical trials and tribulations of our hapless governor, you already know that he's not smart enough to fill out a disclosure form that thousands of others have managed to complete just fine. But "not smart enough" is just a red herring. The truth is, McCrory has been trying to cover up his ties to special interests (most notably, Duke Energy) throughout his career. What most people don't seem to understand is that Duke Energy simply paid Pat McCrory to run for governor for more than a decade. His only job was glad-handing and ass-kissing.

WHAT: Progress NC Action files second ethics complaint against Gov. McCrory
WHEN: Monday, March 9 at 10:30am
WHERE: State Ethics Commission, 424 North Blount St., Raleigh

From Progress NC's press release:

RALEIGH -- Progress NC Action will file a second formal ethics complaint with the State Ethics Commission on Monday morning, further outlining Gov. Pat McCrory’s pattern of deceptive omissions of clear conflicts of interest from his ethics forms. As the complaint shows, Gov. McCrory has failed to properly disclose a number of luxury hotel stays at partisan political conventions which were paid for by the Republican Governors Association. These summits were held behind closed doors at some of the country’s most luxurious and expensive hotels, with unknown corporate donors. Despite Gov. McCrory’s repeated claims that he filled out his Statement of Economic Interest (SEI) forms correctly, the governor now admits that he should have disclosed the trips as gifts.

McCrory’s admission that he should have disclosed the gift of luxury hotel stays comes after he failed to report ownership of Duke Energy stock after the Dan River coal ash spill, and his failure to report over $185,000 in income from Tree.com during his first year as governor in 2013. McCrory made more money from Tree.com in 2013 than he did as governor.

Progress NC Action will file the second complaint around 10:30am Monday at the State Ethics Commission in Raleigh. The group will also deliver more than 11,000 petition signatures asking Gov. McCrory to allow the Ethics Commission to make its investigation public.

McCrory picks MBA to lead EMC

Not unlike asking your lawyer what that lump on your back is:

Gerard Carroll, a former senior vice president at National Gypsum in Charlotte, will replace Benne Hutson as chair of the Environmental Management Commission. The 15-member commission makes rules for North Carolina’s air and water resources. Hutson, a Charlotte lawyer, resigned in January. He cited the time demands of chairing the EMC.

Carroll, who is known as Jerry, worked at National Gypsum for more than 22 years. He’s an Air Force veteran who completed 222 combat missions in Vietnam and earned a masters of business administration from Harvard.

From a lawyer to a business administrator. Not sure if that's a step forward, backward, or simply a step off (the cliff). Whatever the case, neither are even remotely qualified to Chair the Environmental Management Commission. Unless they're planning some bombing sorties to degrade the capabilities of fecal bacteria swimming towards Raleigh. That being said, Caroll's promotion may not be just another random act of idiocy by McCrory. National Gypsum is a big player in the reuse of coal ash residuals, and their wallboard contains some of the nastiest elements of such:

The perils of counsel in North Carolina

An award for renowned lawyers either in or connected to North Carolina and her politics is long overdue. There should be posthumous recipients; too numerous to list here. Three living, breathing law school graduates have now come to mind. First up is Bob Stephens, counsel to Pat McCrory. While helping the Governor complete his 2014 Statement of Economic Interest form for submission to the North Carolina State Ethics Commission, the apparent misunderstanding of how to define "date" and "time" became an issue; still is. Not too far behind Stephens is an attorney named Tom Harris. Anyone who has kept up with the State Employees Association of North Carolina along with the trials and tribulations of Dana Cope knows Mr. Harris both counsels and lurks in the shadows. As an alternative to confession at Our Lady of Lourdes, Harris, Cope and others went to the News & Observer several weeks ago seeking pats on the head in exchange for repentance. We now know how that turned out.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Pat McCrory