psychology

Over 1/3 of Americans are prone to conspiracy theories

This research is long overdue:

In the most comprehensive analysis to date of people who are prone to conspiracy beliefs, a research team in Atlanta sketched out several personality profiles that appear to be distinct. One is familiar: the injustice collector, impulsive and overconfident, who is eager to expose naïveté in everyone but him- or herself. Another is less so: a more solitary, anxious figure, moody and detached, perhaps including many who are older and living alone. The analysis also found, at the extremes, an element of real pathology — of a “personality disorder,” in the jargon of psychiatry.

First let's look at my introductory sentence above. It is based on a (maybe) subconscious belief that conspiracy theories have not been taken seriously by the mental health community, when in fact delusions have been studied intensely for at least the last half-century. It's easy to be reductive; to discount the efforts of professionals on a wide range of subjects, while having no direct knowledge of those efforts. That is not analysis, it's throwing poop from one's cage. Let's talk about that first group of people, the injustice collectors:

The psychological roots of the "Unaffiliated Voter" trend

There's more to it than just disaffection:

More than three-quarters of the growth in voter registrations in North Carolina this year was among unaffiliated rather than signing up as a Republican, Democrat or Libertarian.

This isn't a new trend. Between voters fed up with either party and unsure of which camp they belong in, the ranks of unaffiliated voters have been growing steadily over the past decade.

This is not limited to NC. As a matter of fact, NC is just now catching up with average national numbers. And while disaffection with the two established parties is definitely a factor, Individuation (with a sprinkling of Narcissism) is likely driving the trend more:

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