Republican attack on the environment

Notes from the Kakistocracy: Oil & gas lobbyist set to run Interior

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And NC's fight against offshore drilling takes a punch in the gut:

The Senate vote set this week on the confirmation of David Bernhardt as Interior Secretary is making waves in North Carolina. Bernhardt took the helm at Interior after the resignation of Ryan Zinke, but faced tough questions about his past as an oil and gas lobbyist before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee voted 14-6 to send the nomination to the floor for a vote.

Groups in North Carolina have asked the state's U.S. senators to probe the Trump administration's recent support of seismic drilling. They say under Bernhardt's leadership, the agency charged with protecting national resources could permit harm to North Carolina's coastlines.

Republicans in general, and Senate Republicans in particular, no longer even attempt to avoid conflicts of interest in who runs government agencies. Between Wheeler at the EPA and Bernhardt at Interior, the private sector foxes are literally running the Federal Government henhouse from their Boardrooms. And it's also plain (as day) that Bernhardt has no grasp on ethics whatsoever, since he continued lobbying right up to the minute he was ushered into the Interior Department:

Coal Ash Wednesday: Duke hints at massive rate increases over excavation order

This song is getting painfully old:

In its statement, Duke Energy said excavating the final nine pits would add about “$4 billion to $5 billion to the current estimate of $5.6 billion for the Carolinas.” The company warned that excavation at some sites could take decades, stretching well beyond current state and federal deadlines. It also said excavation would cost significantly more than it would to cap the coal ash under a heavy cover and soil.

Holleman said the company “greatly exaggerates” its cost estimates without taking into account the damage it has caused to the environment and to people’s health. He said the company also underestimates the cost it would incur if it simply drained and capped coal ash in the unlined pits.

Had a conversation (that turned into an argument) recently with a man trying to defend Duke Energy's history of coal ash storage. "Science has come a long way since then" was the major thrust of his argument, trying to give the utility an "out" for not using liners in their coal ash pits. Of course that's not true, because solid waste engineers have known since the late 1960's that toxins can leach into the groundwater from unlined landfills. And of course Duke Energy knew this too, but they were more concerned with returning healthy quarterly dividends than being good stewards of the environment. But hopefully they will soon find out that having us pay for their mistakes won't be as easy as it has been:

Coal Ash Wednesday: The toxification of Puerto Rico

The dangers of being an unincorporated U.S. territory:

Since 2002, when AES’s coal-fired electricity plant was opened under the auspices of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), AES has been littering the territory with poisonous coal ash waste. Over the past 17 years, the Virginia-based company, which produces 17 percent of the territory’s electricity, is responsible for roughly 400,000 documented tons of coal ash, dumped without adequate safeguards, exposing local communities to major public-health hazards.

It's bad enough that we don't clamp down on U.S. companies that dangerously pollute other countries. But Puerto Rico is not a foreign entity; those are American citizens being poisoned, and they deserve the same safeguards we have. That's not asking for much, frankly, because even we don't have the safeguards we need. But this would not fly here:

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