Republican bullies

Virus in the system: Radical GOP out to destroy Democracy

Professor Leutze hits several nails on their heads:

The assault is not on Boehner, or on the speakership, but on the government and the compromise that is essential to its function. It is about states’ rights as distinct from federal rights. It is about so clogging up the machinery essential to doing the public’s business as to make it impossible.

What is to be put in place of their discredited “government”? The radicals have no answer. Their objective is first to discredit then to destroy. They didn’t go to Washington to get something done. Instead they want to keep things from being done. Simply, they do not want government to work.

One thing missing from this essay is the psychological condition known as Misanthropy, the inherent hatred and distrust of our species. When something horrific happens in the news, it's not odd to see a Liberal say, "I hate people." But that's not misanthropy, it's a reaction borne of frustration. A true misanthrope is also a racist, a sexist, a religious purist, and whatever other ideological stances allow him or her to distance themselves from the vast majority of humanity. And because of this mental illness, they have no faith whatsoever that human beings can gather together and work for the common good. They just don't believe it. Which should make them grossly unqualified to take a seat in Congress.

Blistering editorial on #NCGA big-government bullying tactics

And the courage of those who stood up to them:

Before ending its session early Wednesday morning, members of the legislature took one more crack at government overreach, trying to pass measures that would limit the authority and decision-making ability of local city and county governments. And they did so through underhanded methods that should put them to shame.

Fortunately, watchdogs from the media and advocacy groups, as well as other legislators, were paying attention, and the Rules Committee killed the bill.

Unfortunately, there have been many more bills that weren't killed in Committee, that passed floor votes, and were signed by the Governor, that were just as deserving of shame as this piece of Legislation. Including this unnecessarily cruel attack on unemployed hungry people:

NC GOP attacks immigrants and home rule in one bill

Which they probably view as "efficient" lawmaking:

Language added to the measure Wednesday would prohibit cities and counties from adopting "sanctuary" rules for undocumented immigrants, either by local law or policy. Such rules limit when police and sheriffs' deputies can enforce federal immigration law. They also tend to curb the collection of information about a person's immigration status and limit when information about an undocumented person can be transmitted to the federal government.

Cities such as Asheville have adopted such rules because proponents there say it frees up police to concentrate on more troublesome, violent crimes. Advocates say it also helps law enforcement to establish better ties in immigrant communities.

Take it from somebody who lives in Alamance County, the home of rabid anti-immigrant Sheriff Terry Johnson: Going after undocumented workers *does not* make your area safer, it simply allows real criminals the breathing room they need to operate. Taking a brief break from their racial profiling, deputies are periodically forced to do their real jobs:

GOP puts tax reform back in the Budget

And crams it down the throats of Legislators who haven't seen it yet:

“With the tax reform package within the budget, the Special Provisions will run to over 500 pages,” McGrady wrote on Facebook Sunday.

Senate leaders announced Monday morning that they’ll hold the first vote on Tuesday – meaning rank-and-file senators will have only one day to read a complex spending bill that spans 500 pages.

Really? You've been given an additional 2 1/2 months to dick around compose the Budget, but you're only giving duly elected representatives of the people less than 24 hours to study it before casting their votes? Just on principle alone that deserves a whole bunch of "Nay" votes and a Veto, but I'm sure the long knives are coming partially out of their scabbards to force Republican puppets to stay on their strings. What a frickin' circus.

Trudy Wade continues her attacks on municipalities

trudymandering.jpg

Dividing and conquering GOP-style:

“There really isn’t an exit clause for citizens,” Wade said of the perceived historic district shortcoming she aims to fix. “This is just clarifying a way to abolish (the special tax district) if they see the need to do that."

“It’s not written that way,” Vaughan said of Wade’s expressed desire to limit the impact to historic districts. “I know there’s concern among a number of other mayors over the negative impact it could have on their downtowns.” And Vaughan questioned the need for another exit ramp from historic districts, noting that existing law already allows the City Council to abolish such districts.

Oh no, when Trudy says "citizens," she isn't talking about their duly elected representatives, or even the City's citizens themselves as a whole. She's talking about a small subset of citizens who can be manipulated into voting the way the GOP wants. When your party can only claim 19% popularity, here's the approach you must use: (Citywide Referendum = Bad) (Small Enclave Referendum = Good). Why let the voters choose, when you can choose the voters?

Policymaking via the budget

Chris Fitzsimon lowers the boom:

Nobody debated the little-noticed but important provisions because nobody except a handful of Senate leaders even knew they were there. And it’s a safe bet that there are plenty more of them that have yet to be discovered in the massive budget document that is supposed to be legislation detailing how state taxpayer money is spent, not a bill that changes numerous state laws and makes significant policy changes.

The problem isn’t the merits of each idea, though most of them are clearly not in the state’s best interests, but that any significant policy change deserves a full debate and an up or down vote that is impossible when they are part of a larger budget document that legislators in the majority are pressured by their leaders to support.

I'm going to leave an open invitation here for any Republican lawmaker to explain "why" this should be considered acceptable. Buy I'm also not going to hold my breath, either. GOP leadership has demonstrated that debate is an unnecessary impediment, but what that really means is they have no respect for other opinions, even within their own party.

Allowing Greensboro's voters a referendum a "dealbreaker" for GOP

The blatant abuse of power is breathtaking:

The revised bill emerged in the House on Wednesday afternoon in the form of a conference report. It was written by a joint House-Senate committee that wasn’t fully formed until Tuesday afternoon.

Hardister said Wednesday that he sent word to the conference committee that he wanted the bill to include a referendum. “The referendum was a deal-breaker for a majority of the conference committee. I floated it.” The result, he said, was a compromise. “You don’t get everything you want in the legislative process.”

Pretty sure the voters in Greensboro would say "You don't get anything you want in the Legislative process." The most dumbfounding aspect of this story: Republicans feel justified in taking these abusive steps exactly because Greensboro residents would never approve them. How is that for absurdity? "This is the only way we can make this happen, so it is by default a 'legitimate' action." And you're right, it's straight out of George Orwell.

"Piñata Politics" is an apt description

The vendetta against Gene Nichol is childish and destructive:

A last-minute amendment by Senate leaders Wednesday docked the University of North Carolina School of Law budget by $3 million. Democrats say it's political payback for the school's employment of legislative critic Gene Nichol. Sen. Mike Woodard, D-Durham, questioned whether the "capricious" cut would force reductions in financial aid or public service programs at the school. "This feels like the Gene Nichol transfer amendment," Woodard added.

Apodaca did not immediately respond to an inquiry from WRAL News about the timing and rationale for his amendment, but he said nothing to dispute Democrats' accusations during the floor debate.

When vicious attempts by Civitas to uncover wrongdoing on Professor Nichols' part didn't pan out, the next step was to close the Poverty Center. But that still wasn't enough, was it? Because the end goal is to get the outspoken Professor fired, or to force him to resign. Totalitarian regimes are notorious for silencing voices of opposition, and colleges are usually the first places they clamp down.

Bully boy Brock pushes partisan education boards

Stacking the deck in Davie County:

Brock has not responded to inquiries seeking comment. He told the Statesville Record & Landmark two weeks ago that he included Davie County — at the request of the Davie County Republican Party — in a bill that makes school board elections partisan in three other counties. Davie County was included on the third and final reading of the bill, unbeknown to five of the seven school board members and Superintendent Darrin Hartness.

In Davie County, the leadership of the Republican Party is primarily made up of individuals — including Ridenhour and Drechsler — who opposed the recent $54.5 million bond referendum to build a new high school.

Get that? The Republican Party leaders aren't pissed off Democrats are spending too much, they're pissed off the voters (in an R+47 County) were *allowed* to vote on a new high school. A vote that passed 54% to 46%, by the way. Why put up with the hassle of Democracy when you can just rule like a tyrant?

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