Republican idiocy

Tuesday Twitter roundup

The GOP thrives on power, except when they're expected to do the right thing:

Their allegiance to Duke Energy is breathtaking:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

We'll start out with a healthy dose of election year madness:

Can I just go ahead and throw up right now? Thank you. Speaking of throwing up:

Even Republicans tiring of Wos' blithering double-speak

"If I didn't have to waste so much time thinking up lies to tell you, I might get something done."

Lawmakers publicly aired their frustrations with a string of problems at Wos' agency, from difficulty getting budget data to IT problems affecting Medicaid providers and patients alike, and said it could jeopardize their willingness to move forward with the governor's Medicaid reform initiative. Wos responded that her agency is being "micromanaged" by state lawmakers.

Asked to clarify, Wos said federal and state requirements for reporting are onerous, and lawmakers' additional requests for information are an extra burden.

"We beg – ask only what you need from us and not more. We have an incredible amount of reports that we have to present to you," Wos said. "Set your goals, set your expectations and allow us to get there," she told the panel, "allowing people to do what they need to based on their portfolios once you establish what you would like."

Errr...what? On second thought, don't even try to explain it, because that will just make things worse.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Heading for a runoff:

And when it does deteriorate into an extended political brawl, the NC GOP can thank outside elements:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

We'll start out with some nasty business:

A simple recounting of the story's details, which generates this:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

This is what sending a conservative lawyer to Congress will get you:

Justice for the corporations, not the people.

Friday fracking video

And, here are a few others:

Nat Geo covers the "kill zone" in Dan River ecosystem

Disaster on the micro-level:

On the Dan, determining the health of low-lying river creatures such as mussels, clams, crawfish and dragonflies will determine the health of the fish in the river, and later, the birds and animals that feed on those fish. The fear, said Brian Williams, also a Dan River Basin Association program manager, is that the entire food chain along the upper Dan could be imperiled by the presence of coal ash and its poisonous heavy metals. (The Dan River stretches some 200 miles; about 70 miles is affected by the spill.)

Already, though, Williams described the river bottom on the Dan a mile or two below the spill as a virtual “kill zone” for macroinvertebrates because of the amount of toxic sludge that’s settled. At the spill site, there is a coal ash bar some five feet thick and 75 feet long. Coal ash has been detected along the river bottom some 70 miles eastward downstream — all the way to the John Kerr Reservoir north of Raleigh.

Even those critters who survive this calamity will absorb toxins and heavy metals, which will form a bioaccumulation chain that will eventually make any fish pulled from the river or Kerr Lake inedible. Or, more precisely, fish that shouldn't be eaten. Humans are also subject to bioaccumulation.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

We'll start with a chain of causality:

Prejudice against unions in North Carolina is both persistent and illogical. What has being the least-unionized state in the country brought us? Better and more secure jobs? Oh, hell no:

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