social justice

Bishop William Barber receives MacArthur "Genius" award

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Shining a light in the darkness of social injustice:

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation on Thursday named 25 people, including academics, activists, artists, scholars and scientists, who will receive $625,000 over five years to use as they please.

Rev. William Barber, former president of the North Carolina NAACP, was among the 2018 winners, honored for his work to build coalitions to fight racial and economic injustice. Barber, the pastor of Greenleaf Christian Church in Goldsboro, oversaw the Forward Together Movement, which held weekly "Moral Monday" marches and sit-ins while the General Assembly was in session for several years to protest laws passed by the Republican-controlled legislature on issues from voting rights to Medicaid.

I'm not usually one of those people who demand protocol be followed, and Barber himself would probably rebuke me for pushing the issue, but: He should no longer be referred to simply as "Reverend" Barber. In addition to his PhD which should be acknowledged, he has also been elevated to Bishop. And it's not just an honorary title or North Carolina-specific, it's the real deal:

Another Case for Reparations

We often talk about social justice at BlueNC, but we rarely talk about reparations. I'd like to take a step in that direction this morning. I'm not an expert on the subject and until recently didn't spend a lot of time thinking about it. This article in the May issue of The Atlantic by Ta-Nehisi Coates helped me get over the hurdle of understanding the necessity of reparations.

Two hundred fifty years of slavery. Ninety years of Jim Crow. Sixty years of separate but equal. Thirty-five years of racist housing policy. Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole.

Part of what kept me from embracing the idea of reparations was the enormity of what needs to be done and the knowledge that it won't be enough.

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