This is your iPod on drugs

From The Heretic:

Still, intriguing hints suggest that, despite stigma and risk of incarceration, some of our better innovators continued to feed their heads—and society as a whole reaped the benefits. Francis Crick confessed that he was tripping the first time he envisioned the double helix. Steve Jobs called LSD “one of the two or three most important things” he’d experienced. And Bill Wilson claimed it helped to facilitate breakthroughs of a more soulful variety: Decades after co-founding Alcoholics Anonymous, he tried LSD, said it tuned him in to the same spiritual awareness that made sobriety possible, and pitched its therapeutic use—unsuccessfully—to the AA board.

It's long past time to end our insane war on drugs. Come on all you so-called Libertarians. Get off your asses and get something done.

Comments

Some friends and I solved the world peace issue one night

But then the next day we couldn't remember any of the details. So, the next time we took a trip, we took along a tape recorder, which turned out to be a wasted effort. I had no idea I could speak another language so fluently...

Heretic: As a front-line

Heretic: As a front-line worker with the problems associated with addiction and abuse of drugs, I'm WAAAY beyond glorifying the 'spiritual' promise of getting high. If you can't take seriously and address the very real problems drugs cause, you're not going to influence anybody.

It is a serious issue

But the "war on drugs" approach the government has taken has produced countless negative consequences, from unequal incarceration for crack vs cocaine (the rich man's drug) to murderous cartels in Mexico and elsewhere.

And instead of dedicating confiscated wealth from the drug trade to effective (yet expensive) treatment programs, that money is spent (for the most part) to help law enforcement catch more sick people so they can be fed into the gaping maw of the prison industrial complex.

So yes, the subject needs to be taken seriously by all, and that includes policymakers who need to recognize a failure when they see one, and injustice whenever it crops up.