Anybody Here Got A Degree from a UNC-System School?

This guy—this North Carolinian—says that your alma mater is a "rubber-stamp institute where you get a degree for paying the money without actually learning anything." And just to be clear, this isn't a college rivalry thing. This guy believes that public education is for wussies.

I've Been Wondering About 527s

The US House recently voted to restrict giving to 527 organisations (political groups not regulated by FEC regulations). I kind of figured that in a Republican-controlled legislature, this would primarily be a bad thing for Democrats. But I also knew that I didn't know enough on the topic say much about it.

George Will, on the other hand, feels comfortable speaking out. In this one vote he sees reason enough to ditch the vast majority of House Republicans, who (he says) "used their power for their only remaining purpose -- to cling to power." He's mad, you see. (He doesn't explain why it has taken this vote or this issue to finally lead him to the conclusion "that House Republicans are not worth working for in October or venturing out to vote for in November.")

Anyway, here's why I even noticed his column: "How many principled Republicans remain? Only 18. The following, who voted against restricting 527s: ...Walter Jones (North Carolina),...."

Find the Theme:

The winner gets some nice hot grumblecakes.

NC Health Care Recommendations: Cost

On April 11, 2006, the North Carolina House Select Committee on Health Care released recommendations for the 2006 legislative short session. Many of them will be controversial, and taken together they have the potential to significantly change the way that North Carolinians access health care and insurance (and how much we pay). Some of these topics are pretty technical, but no less important for their difficulty. I'm hoping that these posts will begin a conversation on the best course for North Carolina's efforts at healthcare reform.

I'll publish the recommendations of the six subcommittees in six posts, along with some of the background information from each report. The subcommittees are:

NC Health Care Recommendations: Medicaid

On April 11, 2006, the North Carolina House Select Committee on Health Care released recommendations for the 2006 legislative short session. Many of them will be controversial, and taken together they have the potential to significantly change the way that North Carolinians access health care and insurance (and how much we pay). Some of these topics are pretty technical, but no less important for their difficulty. I'm hoping that these posts will begin a conversation on the best course for North Carolina's efforts at healthcare reform.

I'll publish the recommendations of the six subcommittees in six posts, along with some of the background information from each report. The subcommittees are:

Sue who?

This from the odd couple over at Talking about politics.

My old friend and adversary Jack Hawke sponsored a conservative gripe-a-thon in Durham last week. "It is a travesty that North Carolina is controlled by the Democrats," U.S. Representative Virginia Foxx told the N.C. Conservative Leadership Conference.

I disagree, of course. I believe it's a credit to the good judgment of North Carolinians that Democrats hold the Governor's Office and both houses of the GA. But Jack had one thing right. The state GOP lacks a strong spokesperson. No star power, if you will.

The worm is turning

Congressman Charles Taylor's (NC-11) normally subservient propaganda apparatus today came up with the intestinal fortitude to tentatively remind the Titanic's captain there appears to be an iceberg ahead.

In an editorial aggressively headlined:

Voters deserve some answers from Taylor

the Asheville Citizen Times had the temerity to remind North Carolina Congressman Charles Taylor (R-11) that "hey, cap'm. You know if the ship goes down, there really ain't enough lifeboats."

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