NCGA

Tuesday Twitter roundup

A North Carolina toady, no less. A multi-millionaire trying to stifle the votes of the less fortunate, Louis DeJoy is vintage Trump.

Monday Numbers: Missing the remote learning bus

catcomputer.jpg

You need both a connection and a device to join in:

468,967 – number of students without an adequate internet connection for remote learning, or 30%

355,304 – number of students without adequate devices for remote learning, or 23%

9,818 – number of teachers without a high–speed internet connection, or 10%

3,051 – number of teachers without an adequate device for remote learning, or 3%

Just one of the many failures of the "Free Market" in providing equitable access to critical needs. And just one more of Pat McCrory's failures as Governor. If you will remember, he touted the Connect NC Bond relentlessly, but when Republicans in the General Assembly stripped out the Broadband part of the Bond, instead of fighting them tooth and nail, McCrory folded like a lawn chair.

Democracy is calling: Poll workers desperately needed for 2020 Election

election2020a.jpg

Add this to your list of critical essential workers during this pandemic:

Many county elections directors started recruiting poll workers earlier than normal, are using new recruitment strategies, have increased pay and are partnering with the North Carolina State Board of Elections, political parties and voter rights groups to find people to work the election.

Officials anticipate a shortage of poll workers could cause longer lines, last-minute precinct closures and voter confusion. That was the case in Georgia and Wisconsin, where poll worker shortages during primaries caused precinct closures, hours-long lines and disenfranchised voters.

While it's true that absentee by-mail voting is going to increase substantially this year (the more the better), we're still only talking about maybe 1/3 of all votes. We need, now more than ever, properly-staffed and prolific early voting locations, and poll workers for all the precinct voting sites. The fact that many county BOEs have had their budgets cut due to a major drop in local revenues merely exacerbates a problem we knew we were going to have, since elderly volunteers usually make up the bulk of election workers, people who are extremely vulnerable to COVID 19:

Cruelty is the point: The NC GOP's war on the poor & unemployed

There is simply no excuse for this draconian behavior:

It started in 2013 when, just after securing the governorship on top of both houses, the GOP supermajority passed HB4, a bill that made unprecedented cuts to unemployment compensation.

The bill lowered the maximum weekly payment amount from $535 to $350 and completely eliminated state appropriations for unemployment program administration, forcing the program to rely on declining federal funds. As a result, staff time designated to processing initial claims dropped by more than half from 2005 to 2020.

Get that? All these delays in processing the mountain of unemployment claims caused by the pandemic can (and should) be laid at the feet of Legislative Republicans. All this time they've been pointing a finger at Governor Cooper, they should have been pointing it at themselves. That's actually a question I've been trying to answer for a couple months, but I've been approaching it wrong. I looked at budgets going back five years to see if I could find a drop in funding, and couldn't seem to find said line items at all. That's because they're gone, and have been since 2013. Tens of thousands of North Carolinians have suffered because of that, and most of them blame the Cooper administration:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

He's either doing nothing or doing the wrong thing. He's not even a broken clock.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Two-faced Tillis strikes again...

'It wasn't an insult, I was just showing how much I care!" Idiot.

Voting during a pandemic: Hearings begin today on lawsuit to ease restrictions

voteabsentee.jpg

The differences between a genuine threat (Coronavirus) and a perceived threat (voter fraud):

U.S. District Judge William Osteen scheduled three days of hearings starting Monday involving a lawsuit by two voting advocacy groups and several citizens who fear current rules threaten their health if they want to vote. There's already been a spike in mail-in absentee ballot applications, presumably by voters who prefer not to venture out to in-person voting centers and precincts.

The plaintiffs want Osteen to block several voting restrictions like how mail-in ballots are requested, who can help voters with forms and the hours early in-person voting centers operate. They also want drop boxes for completed absentee ballots and later registration deadlines.

I find it almost absurd that groups have to file their lawsuits against the NC Board of Elections, and not the Republican lawmakers who put these roadblocks in place. The NC BoE has tried to get many of these changes done by asking those Republicans, and have been mostly rebuffed. Granted, if the court rules to do x or y, Republicans will have to comply anyway. But it just seems wrong. But I won't be surprised of those Republicans file their own lawsuit against the Board of Elections over this necessary policy order:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - NCGA