NCGA

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Bound to be the hot topic for at least a few days:

Since Persily's mandate only covered a handful of districts, the redraw does not represent sweeping changes to the whole state, just a few clusters:

Harry Brown's anti-wind energy "maps" are still alive

windturbines.jpg

This is why we can't have nice things:

Brown, whose district includes the largest Marine base on the East Coast, believes the turbines could interfere with military radar or flight routes, and cause Department of Defense officials to close, downsize, or relocate military installations to other states. The solution, he says, is a statewide map that will rule out wind energy in certain places.

“The map says it’s okay here, it’s not okay here,” Brown told Southeast Energy News this summer. “To me that’s the only way we’re ever going to be able to resolve this issue.”

There's nothing to resolve, you idiot. There are already multiple mechanisms in place to safeguard the airspace for both military and civilian aircraft, which means this move by Brown is really about something else. And that something else becomes clearer by his effort to draw in Solar and Biomass energy projects into his crusade:

Sorry Not Sorry: Chemours "accidentally" spills more Genx into Cape Fear

Old (nasty) habits are apparently hard to break:

In a press release Thursday afternoon, officials with the state Department of Environmental Quality said preliminary data revealed a spike in the levels of GenX in untreated water near the chemical company's Fayetteville Works facility in Bladen County. After contacting the company, DEQ spokesman Jamie Kritzer said Chemours officials revealed that workers had spilled dimer acid fluoride during planned maintenance at the plant Oct. 6.

Dimer acid fluoride effectively breaks down in water into the equivalent of GenX, a poorly studied and unregulated contaminant in a family of chemicals linked to cancer and other negative health effects. Kritzer said it's unclear how much of the chemical leaked or how long it spilled into the Cape Fear River.

As our Riverkeepers and their cadre of volunteer water watchers will tell you, such "accidents" happen way too often to not be intentional. Whether it's polluting industries or municipal wastewater treatment plants, there are numerous cases of "Oops!" that occur every year. Because making it somebody else's problem is the easiest way to deal with chemicals and sewage. Until it starts costing you a lot of money, which is what needs to happen.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Geremy the Germ has an important public service announcement:

To clarify, Geremy wrote that yesterday, meaning the election is today. Tuesday. I'll have a talk with Geremy about the concept of time passing, and how certain terminology might cause your message to become moribund in just a few hours' time. Is that 4th person? Am I speaking in 4th person? I'm easily confused...

Choosing voodoo economics over successful ventures a recipe for failure

The following Op-Ed was apparently not ready for Prime Time viewing:

NC’s motto “Esse Quam Videri,” to be rather than to seem, should be more than just a quaint Latin reference on our State’s Seal. It should be an organic, working principle to guide us, as it was originally intended. Even for those on the right who profess to believe state government should be run like a business, when something you’re doing is working, and working so well it exceeds all expectations you had about its viability, you don’t try to actively undermine that success. Scheme and plot to make it go away. If you did that in a publicly-held corporation, your shareholders would revolt, and sweep that Board of Directors right out the door, and replace them with more responsible leaders.

In the government realm, those shareholders are the voting public, not the shadowy PACs funded by wealthy individuals who would sacrifice overall economic growth for personal profits every day of the week.

Author's note: Sometimes these essays have their origin in a single misleading sentence in the news, generating a desire to set the record straight. In this case, it was actually a symbol that I had seen one too many times, the Georgia Film logo (with a peach, of course) that got my mind churning. Here's the rest:

Primer on the NC GOP's war on the court system

gavelbanging.jpg

A systematic and sustained effort to subvert the judiciary:

Number of actions they've taken in recent years to change the makeup and independence of state, district and local courts: at least 12

Date on which the N.C. legislature sustained a bill eliminating judicial primary elections that Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper had vetoed: 10/16/2017

Days later that they introduced a bill to wipe out the terms of all state judges, from the N.C. Supreme Court to the district courts, at the close of 2018 and require them to run again: 1

Hat-tip to the Institute for Southern Studies for compiling this list. Every single one of those Legislative Republicans who are licensed attorneys should be disbarred for these attacks, or at least formally (and loudly) censured by the NC Bar Association. Follow the link to see the true depth of the GOP's meddling, but here's another taste:

Exploring the mind of the Special Master

Nathan Persily has been a staunch advocate for democracy for years:

Republicans don’t necessarily have a problem with Persily’s credentials, which are many, or his map-drawing chops, which are considerable. They worry about what GOP lawyer Phil Strach called “possible bias.” They’re right about that, but maybe not for the reason they think.

He has characterized gerrymandering as “partisan greed” – which happens to be true, regardless of which party is engaging in it. He has frowned at the Supreme Court’s campaign finance decision in Citizens United because of the power it gave to the few – Democrat or Republican – who have a lot of money. He has argued against a Texas effort to draw districts based on eligible voters instead of total population, because it would dilute the voting power of a growing Latino population.

In summary, Persily has been laser-focused on defending the rights and Constitutionally-granted powers of individual voters, matters the NC GOP has worked against relentlessly since they were granted a majority by those same voters. Why would you do that? Why would you punish those who had entrusted you? The logical answer is: Because you knew from the start you were going to exceed your mandate, take steps that are clearly in violation of (at least) the spirit of the NC Constitution and your previously stated principles, and you wanted to make sure those voters would not be able to correct their mistake. Here's more on Persily:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - NCGA